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Events & Media AU    |   

John is 5 minutes late for work every day while his colleague Martha is late for 30 minutes once a week. Do these late clock ins really matter? For many businesses, they do. In shift work industries and frontline roles, frequent tardiness can mean disruption and loss of profit. Even just 10 minutes of being late accumulates over time and eats away at the bottom line.  But in a 2017 CareerBuilder survey, 29% of respondents said they came in late at least once a month. 49% blame the traffic for their tardiness, 32% blame it on oversleeping, while the rest blame bad weather, procrastination, and “too tired to get out of bed.” How can managers discourage lateness among employees? How to increase employee attendance Many traditional managers believe that harsh sanctions are the best way to eliminate lateness at work. However, sanctions lower employee morale. They can drive productivity down and result in a high turnover rate. That’s why at this year’s Workforce Success Conference, we are inviting students to propose ways to increase employee attendance in Australia. Read on to know more about the tried-and-tested ways to increase employee attendance. Get the chance to improve on these methods by signing up for the case competition today! An internship and cash prize awaits the winner. 1. Track time and attendance accurately The first step to making sure that proper clock ins and outs are observed is by tracking them accurately. Otherwise, your company will be exposed to a risk of time theft, or employees being paid for the hours they did not work. Lax monitoring systems make companies vulnerable. Manual time clocks are no longer reliable, as they are susceptible to time theft. Investing in cloud-based time and attendance software saves you time and energy on processing employee timesheets. Download a clocking system app for free and give it a try. Read more: Time Theft: Top 3 ways employees steal time and how to stop it 2. Address frequent lateness ASAP Feedback and coaching are important parts changing behaviour. Those who fail to meet time and attendance targets could be doing so for any number of reasons, such as single parenthood, chronic illness, or even financial instability. Understanding what they are going through is instrumental to helping them perform better. Managers should be able to empower employees to comply with their work hours. Schedule consultations with them to identify the issues and address them accordingly. Download and customise: Written warning - Late Attendance 3. Reward good employee attendance Deducting pay for frequent lateness is one solution and is a common one. But employee incentives for punctuality serve to underscore the importance of time and attendance in a more positive way. There are many ways managers have incentivised coming in on time. They require some work for managers, but the effect on morale and productivity cannot be understated. Here are some of the most frequently used strategies to increase employee attendance. Provide free breakfast once a month One popular way to reward punctuality is to provide free breakfast. This can be done once a month on a set day, or even more frequently, but on random days. Those who have good attendance will feel the benefits of coming in early, while those who don’t will start thinking about it. Give out tokens to multiple employees Gift cards, lunch vouchers, and company apparel cost little but are always appreciated. Keeping the rewards budget-friendly will allow you to give them out to more people and more often. It’s also a great way to keep attention on the program. Create a “Hall of Fame” for time and attendance Publicly recognise employees who consistently come in on time and do not have unexcused absences. It will boost their morale, and hopefully inspire others to follow suit. Give consistent performers time off Don’t think of this as an additional expense, because a consistent performer will have more than made up for it. This can be the high value reward given out during your end-of-year party. Include a plane ticket and hotel accommodations if you can afford it! Read more: Only a Matter of Time: Punctuality and attendance in multicultural workplaces Forge the workforce of the future Modern managers are people-centric. Many of them want to create a work culture built on trust, respect, and balance. When employees are constantly late to work, there are usually reasons that lie below the surface. Empowering them through attendance programs are more likely to increase morale and productivity. Sanctions and punishments for lateness are sometimes necessary, but there is plenty of room for creativity in this area of management. In the end, increasing employee attendance will benefit not just them, but also their team and the company as a whole.   Ready to forge the workforce of the future by increasing employee attendance? Form a team of 3-5 students and sign up today. A cash prize and internship awaits! We’ll email you more details and provide consultation once you sign up.

Forging the Workforce of the Future: Can you increase employee attendance?

23 May 2019

Events & Media AU    |   

“Anywhere and everywhere you go, people need hospitality people. So it\'s kind of like a ticket to ride, it gives you a fantastic experience to not only travel through different cities or countries for that matter, but along the way, you get the skills, you gather experiences, you gather knowledge,” says Gary Johnson, National Food Manager for Spirit Hotels. From his first job working at the back of the house, he is now an internationally recognised and award-winning chef. With over 40 years of culinary experience and leadership in restaurants, pubs and hotels, he is a force to be reckoned with in hospitality management. Managing Chefs, delivering hospitality “Hospitality is as diverse as it is a potpourri not only of different dishes, skills, nationalities,” Gary shares, “but any country, anywhere you go, everybody loves great food and everybody loves hospitality.” Drawing on his vast experience, this 2011 Australian Hotel Association (AHA) “National Chef of the Year” currently manages 88 hotels nationally. With thousands of staff, 5 million meals, and $80 million of food sales annually, how does he keep up? Below are Gary Johnson’s five tips for success in managing chefs and making the most out of the hospitality industry. 1. “Trust always comes back to you” “I believe that if you give people the respect that they deserve, it always comes back to you,” he begins. Gary’s collaborative management style is hinged on honest communication with his teams. He wants them to understand how important their roles are and trust them to get the job done. “Some of the chefs can misbehave [but] they’re the ones that don’t last very long in our industry. They probably don\'t get the best out of their people in the long term anyway. And if it\'s only a short-term thing, well you\'ve wasted your time and money so that can only end in sadness,” he quips. Read more: Revolutionising Employee Engagement with Pragmatic Thinking’s Mikey Ellis Chef Gary Johnson (middle) with Chef Kenneth Bryce (left) and Sam Burke (right) at Red Meat 2018 in Canberra. Source: Farm Online 2. “Understand what people want from the leadership team” A 2017 survey from hospitality software provider Impos found that more than half of Australian businesses had difficulty hiring and retaining staff. Gary had the same experience when he first joined the Spirit Hotels group. “We had a turnover of around 150%. Katrina Gill in the HR department and I put plans together instead of wasting time and money from both sides of the fence. We really got down to being in touch with our people and learning how to understand what they wanted from us as a leadership team and what the business could give back to them long-term for their careers,” he says. Now their turnover rate is hovering at 40%, a huge improvement from what it used to be. Read more: How to Achieve Culture by Design with Career Culture Lab’s Amanda Lutvey “In the seven and a half years that I\'ve been with the [Spirit Hotels] group we still have the same people who started as kitchen hands who are now head chefs,” he adds. Gary also employed staff who started casually waiting on tables while they were in university who have now diversified. Some have even done a hospitality degree and ended up running the hotels. “There was a really great career path and a trajectory from the beginning. If you\'re a people person if you love hospitality, then it will be very good to you.” 3. “Find out what works best with which people” Gary has worked in both small restaurants and big hotels in several different countries. The secret, according to him, is blending in and learning along the way. “You have to be somewhat like a chameleon: draw on those managerial experiences and your own resources to be able to find out what works best with which people.” The key to having people stay is having genuine conversations about where they see themselves going and adapting your management style to deliver that.  He continues, “Generally, I also find that people don\'t necessarily work for a particular company. Although that definitely has a bearing but they\'ll work for leaders that they respect, appreciate, and trust. That\'s the big key.” [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7miX6CFpuEg&feature=youtu.be[/embed] 4. “Back up your intuition with big data analytics” “Culture is integral and I believe very much so in any service industry, especially in the hospitality business, if you have a progressive, dynamic, cohesive culture then you generally have a pretty healthy business,” he reflects. But spreadsheets and numbers can only tell you so much. “I also believe that from time to time deep data analytics is no substitute for intuition. You can back up your intuition with some big data analytics and it\'ll give you a pretty good indication of how the business is traveling.” According to Gary, having both data and intuition honed by being on the frontline will give you a much better grasp of business culture and progress. Read more: Four Ways to Keep your Managers on the Frontline 5. “It’s better to train people regardless of their length of stay” “Training is not cheap but it\'s better to have better to train people and have them not stay for a long time, rather than not train them and have them stay for a long time,” Gary says. “The most important part is definitely having somebody there that can that can mentor that new person coming,” he continues. “We\'ve all been there. We\'ve all started the new job and it could be a pretty nervous time. If you\'ve got somebody that can look after that person at least for the first three weeks, and then follow it up yourself. And in the first quarter, make sure that you actually sit down with them. There might only be 15 minutes but it is a valuable piece of time and investment that you\'ll make for that person.” He believes the best and most efficient way is to identify the people who can deliver culture, skills, and competencies that you need in a role and buddy them up with new hires. This is part of an effective onboarding process that any company should invest in. Good employee onboarding helps them perform better and determines whether or not they will stay with the company. “I generally find if you get those people through and they enjoy the first three months, you have them for three years or even longer. So that to me would be the best advice I give anybody if they\'re having a high turnover [rate].” Free download: In this Tanda eBook, we discuss why onboarding matters and present a complete onboarding checklist for employers, including a way to measure success! Mentoring the next generation is success Gary Johnson’s decades of international experience in the hospitality industry is instrumental to managing hotels and training new industry leaders. At the heart of it is his people-centered vision of management. The culture of taking care of clients starts with taking care of your own employees. “You can tell people what to do and you\'ll get workers. But if you show people what to do, if you mentor them, develop them, and get to know them even better and then trust them, you get leaders,” he concludes. “I think the mark of success of any good leader should be in developing other leaders, and that\'s what we\'re all about.” Want to manage your hospitality business better? Looking for ways to change the game in your industry? Learn from Gary Johnson and other topnotch speakers at the Workforce Success Conference on 26 July 2019. Get your tickets now!

Gary Johnson’s 5 Tips for Managing the Hospitality Industry

23 May 2019

Events & Media AU    |   

“Rules are important, but it’s just exactly how far we take those rules and how much flexibility or empowerment we give our team.” An Associate Professor at the Queensland University of Technology, Dr. Gary Mortimer is Australia’s leading retail expert and researcher. A regular media commentator with more than 70 published manuscripts, articles, and industry reports, he brings to the table more than 25 years of experience working with the biggest retail brands in the country. Ahead of his session at this year’s Workforce Success Conference, the specialist in food retail, retail operations, and consumer behaviour sat down with Tanda to talk about staff empowerment, bending the rules a little, and doing something new. Consumer-oriented Positive Deviance Dr. Mortimer isn’t against rules. They’re integral for function. “Rules are necessary, particularly if you’re running a financial organisation or a pharmacy or a retailer. You want to ensure there are some rules in place. You want your customers to walk in and have a positive experience, but also a consistent experience across your different brands, your different businesses.” But bending the rules in service of overall productivity isn’t messing with them for the sake of it. Managers and employees need to look at what they can do to help customers, and finding a balance between rule enforcement and leniency is key. [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-u4PcnsL1hQ[/embed] He calls this “consumer-oriented positive deviance,” wherein team members are empowered enough that they can solve problems without needing a manager to sign off on every small decision. Employees enjoy this, and it results in a happier more satisfied team willing to stay longer at a job. (This topic would ring a bell to those who’ve heard his talk from last year’s Workforce Success Conference.) Not only does it same time for leaders whose schedules are full of other matters, but it’s a way of looking at running your business through a different lens--a more strategic one. “Differentiate, not demonstrate” Observing how a variety of businesses have been responding to disruption in their chosen markets, Dr. Gary Mortimer implores workers to “differentiate, not demonstrate.” Uber’s launch in Australia is a prime example of the consequences of too much demonstration: traditional taxi companies held demonstrations against the ride-hailing app’s entry, but at the end of the day it was the customers who wanted an alternative anyway. If customers clearly want the alternative, demonstrations are a negative way of responding to that challenge. That effort, according to Dr. Mortimer, could have instead been channeled into re-examining subpar business models and asking how they can differentiate moving forward: “Protest all you want, but it’s probably better to spend some positive energy looking at ‘how can I differentiate my business?’, ‘how can i understand my customers more?’” Most companies do make strides to grow with the times, but fall short because they view changes as what they’re “supposed to do” rather than sincerely believing in the changes. Mortimer gives social media customer service as one example—how many brands have accounts for show, but fail to respond when an individual actually engages with them through there? Truly differentiating your business from the rest means a commitment to thoroughly execute plans. Transforming the Retail Experience The ubiquity of e-commerce can give physical stores a run for their money. However, this has pushed certain retailers to think about inventive ways to utilise store space to keep up. Dr. Mortimer points out athleisure brand Lululemon. In theory, similar products can be found elsewhere for cheaper prices, but the brand builds loyalty by going beyond just selling products. “What they’re doing is they’re building community around their brand,” Dr. Mortimer says. They understand they can’t compete with other stores when it comes to price, so they tap into their customer base’s love for yoga and fitness instead by opening up their store after close of business and hosting free classes weekly. Entirely new businesses are sprouting to solve the problems of traditional retail companies, too. Speed is currency now that nearly every retailer has an ecommerce store, so innovative startups are utilising the gig economy to fix consumer pain points. “What we’re going to see, particularly in the retail space is that blending of physical and digital, and it has to be that way.” The Future of Australian Retail The takeaway from all of these observations? Longevity and name recall is not a savior. Many big retailers look the same to customers, so they will always tend towards the brand with the cheapest price unless it can differentiate and provide something other stores don’t have. As some retailers won’t be able to keep up with the pressure to evolve, expect rationalisation of the marketplace in 3-5 years. Downsizing, store closures, the works—and use it as motivation to push your business further.   Want to know how to empower your employees and take your business to the next level? Catch Dr. Gary Mortimer’s talk alongside other great speakers at the Workforce Success Conference 2019, to be held on the 26th of July, 2019.

Dr. Gary Mortimer on bending the rules of business

21 May 2019

Events & Media AU    |   

John is 5 minutes late for work every day while his colleague Martha is late for 30 minutes once a week. Do these late clock ins really matter? For many businesses, they do. In shift work industries and frontline roles, frequent tardiness can mean disruption and loss of profit. Even just 10 minutes of being late accumulates over time and eats away at the bottom line.  But in a 2017 CareerBuilder survey, 29% of respondents said they came in late at least once a month. 49% blame the traffic for their tardiness, 32% blame it on oversleeping, while the rest blame bad weather, procrastination, and “too tired to get out of bed.” How can managers discourage lateness among employees? How to increase employee attendance Many traditional managers believe that harsh sanctions are the best way to eliminate lateness at work. However, sanctions lower employee morale. They can drive productivity down and result in a high turnover rate. That’s why at this year’s Workforce Success Conference, we are inviting students to propose ways to increase employee attendance in Australia. Read on to know more about the tried-and-tested ways to increase employee attendance. Get the chance to improve on these methods by signing up for the case competition today! An internship and cash prize awaits the winner. 1. Track time and attendance accurately The first step to making sure that proper clock ins and outs are observed is by tracking them accurately. Otherwise, your company will be exposed to a risk of time theft, or employees being paid for the hours they did not work. Lax monitoring systems make companies vulnerable. Manual time clocks are no longer reliable, as they are susceptible to time theft. Investing in cloud-based time and attendance software saves you time and energy on processing employee timesheets. Download a clocking system app for free and give it a try. Read more: Time Theft: Top 3 ways employees steal time and how to stop it 2. Address frequent lateness ASAP Feedback and coaching are important parts changing behaviour. Those who fail to meet time and attendance targets could be doing so for any number of reasons, such as single parenthood, chronic illness, or even financial instability. Understanding what they are going through is instrumental to helping them perform better. Managers should be able to empower employees to comply with their work hours. Schedule consultations with them to identify the issues and address them accordingly. Download and customise: Written warning - Late Attendance 3. Reward good employee attendance Deducting pay for frequent lateness is one solution and is a common one. But employee incentives for punctuality serve to underscore the importance of time and attendance in a more positive way. There are many ways managers have incentivised coming in on time. They require some work for managers, but the effect on morale and productivity cannot be understated. Here are some of the most frequently used strategies to increase employee attendance. Provide free breakfast once a month One popular way to reward punctuality is to provide free breakfast. This can be done once a month on a set day, or even more frequently, but on random days. Those who have good attendance will feel the benefits of coming in early, while those who don’t will start thinking about it. Give out tokens to multiple employees Gift cards, lunch vouchers, and company apparel cost little but are always appreciated. Keeping the rewards budget-friendly will allow you to give them out to more people and more often. It’s also a great way to keep attention on the program. Create a “Hall of Fame” for time and attendance Publicly recognise employees who consistently come in on time and do not have unexcused absences. It will boost their morale, and hopefully inspire others to follow suit. Give consistent performers time off Don’t think of this as an additional expense, because a consistent performer will have more than made up for it. This can be the high value reward given out during your end-of-year party. Include a plane ticket and hotel accommodations if you can afford it! Read more: Only a Matter of Time: Punctuality and attendance in multicultural workplaces Forge the workforce of the future Modern managers are people-centric. Many of them want to create a work culture built on trust, respect, and balance. When employees are constantly late to work, there are usually reasons that lie below the surface. Empowering them through attendance programs are more likely to increase morale and productivity. Sanctions and punishments for lateness are sometimes necessary, but there is plenty of room for creativity in this area of management. In the end, increasing employee attendance will benefit not just them, but also their team and the company as a whole.   Ready to forge the workforce of the future by increasing employee attendance? Form a team of 3-5 students and sign up today. A cash prize and internship awaits! We’ll email you more details and provide consultation once you sign up.

Forging the Workforce of the Future: Can you increase employee attendance?

23 May 2019

Events & Media AU    |   

“Anywhere and everywhere you go, people need hospitality people. So it\'s kind of like a ticket to ride, it gives you a fantastic experience to not only travel through different cities or countries for that matter, but along the way, you get the skills, you gather experiences, you gather knowledge,” says Gary Johnson, National Food Manager for Spirit Hotels. From his first job working at the back of the house, he is now an internationally recognised and award-winning chef. With over 40 years of culinary experience and leadership in restaurants, pubs and hotels, he is a force to be reckoned with in hospitality management. Managing Chefs, delivering hospitality “Hospitality is as diverse as it is a potpourri not only of different dishes, skills, nationalities,” Gary shares, “but any country, anywhere you go, everybody loves great food and everybody loves hospitality.” Drawing on his vast experience, this 2011 Australian Hotel Association (AHA) “National Chef of the Year” currently manages 88 hotels nationally. With thousands of staff, 5 million meals, and $80 million of food sales annually, how does he keep up? Below are Gary Johnson’s five tips for success in managing chefs and making the most out of the hospitality industry. 1. “Trust always comes back to you” “I believe that if you give people the respect that they deserve, it always comes back to you,” he begins. Gary’s collaborative management style is hinged on honest communication with his teams. He wants them to understand how important their roles are and trust them to get the job done. “Some of the chefs can misbehave [but] they’re the ones that don’t last very long in our industry. They probably don\'t get the best out of their people in the long term anyway. And if it\'s only a short-term thing, well you\'ve wasted your time and money so that can only end in sadness,” he quips. Read more: Revolutionising Employee Engagement with Pragmatic Thinking’s Mikey Ellis Chef Gary Johnson (middle) with Chef Kenneth Bryce (left) and Sam Burke (right) at Red Meat 2018 in Canberra. Source: Farm Online 2. “Understand what people want from the leadership team” A 2017 survey from hospitality software provider Impos found that more than half of Australian businesses had difficulty hiring and retaining staff. Gary had the same experience when he first joined the Spirit Hotels group. “We had a turnover of around 150%. Katrina Gill in the HR department and I put plans together instead of wasting time and money from both sides of the fence. We really got down to being in touch with our people and learning how to understand what they wanted from us as a leadership team and what the business could give back to them long-term for their careers,” he says. Now their turnover rate is hovering at 40%, a huge improvement from what it used to be. Read more: How to Achieve Culture by Design with Career Culture Lab’s Amanda Lutvey “In the seven and a half years that I\'ve been with the [Spirit Hotels] group we still have the same people who started as kitchen hands who are now head chefs,” he adds. Gary also employed staff who started casually waiting on tables while they were in university who have now diversified. Some have even done a hospitality degree and ended up running the hotels. “There was a really great career path and a trajectory from the beginning. If you\'re a people person if you love hospitality, then it will be very good to you.” 3. “Find out what works best with which people” Gary has worked in both small restaurants and big hotels in several different countries. The secret, according to him, is blending in and learning along the way. “You have to be somewhat like a chameleon: draw on those managerial experiences and your own resources to be able to find out what works best with which people.” The key to having people stay is having genuine conversations about where they see themselves going and adapting your management style to deliver that.  He continues, “Generally, I also find that people don\'t necessarily work for a particular company. Although that definitely has a bearing but they\'ll work for leaders that they respect, appreciate, and trust. That\'s the big key.” [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7miX6CFpuEg&feature=youtu.be[/embed] 4. “Back up your intuition with big data analytics” “Culture is integral and I believe very much so in any service industry, especially in the hospitality business, if you have a progressive, dynamic, cohesive culture then you generally have a pretty healthy business,” he reflects. But spreadsheets and numbers can only tell you so much. “I also believe that from time to time deep data analytics is no substitute for intuition. You can back up your intuition with some big data analytics and it\'ll give you a pretty good indication of how the business is traveling.” According to Gary, having both data and intuition honed by being on the frontline will give you a much better grasp of business culture and progress. Read more: Four Ways to Keep your Managers on the Frontline 5. “It’s better to train people regardless of their length of stay” “Training is not cheap but it\'s better to have better to train people and have them not stay for a long time, rather than not train them and have them stay for a long time,” Gary says. “The most important part is definitely having somebody there that can that can mentor that new person coming,” he continues. “We\'ve all been there. We\'ve all started the new job and it could be a pretty nervous time. If you\'ve got somebody that can look after that person at least for the first three weeks, and then follow it up yourself. And in the first quarter, make sure that you actually sit down with them. There might only be 15 minutes but it is a valuable piece of time and investment that you\'ll make for that person.” He believes the best and most efficient way is to identify the people who can deliver culture, skills, and competencies that you need in a role and buddy them up with new hires. This is part of an effective onboarding process that any company should invest in. Good employee onboarding helps them perform better and determines whether or not they will stay with the company. “I generally find if you get those people through and they enjoy the first three months, you have them for three years or even longer. So that to me would be the best advice I give anybody if they\'re having a high turnover [rate].” Free download: In this Tanda eBook, we discuss why onboarding matters and present a complete onboarding checklist for employers, including a way to measure success! Mentoring the next generation is success Gary Johnson’s decades of international experience in the hospitality industry is instrumental to managing hotels and training new industry leaders. At the heart of it is his people-centered vision of management. The culture of taking care of clients starts with taking care of your own employees. “You can tell people what to do and you\'ll get workers. But if you show people what to do, if you mentor them, develop them, and get to know them even better and then trust them, you get leaders,” he concludes. “I think the mark of success of any good leader should be in developing other leaders, and that\'s what we\'re all about.” Want to manage your hospitality business better? Looking for ways to change the game in your industry? Learn from Gary Johnson and other topnotch speakers at the Workforce Success Conference on 26 July 2019. Get your tickets now!

Gary Johnson’s 5 Tips for Managing the Hospitality Industry

23 May 2019

Events & Media AU    |   

“Rules are important, but it’s just exactly how far we take those rules and how much flexibility or empowerment we give our team.” An Associate Professor at the Queensland University of Technology, Dr. Gary Mortimer is Australia’s leading retail expert and researcher. A regular media commentator with more than 70 published manuscripts, articles, and industry reports, he brings to the table more than 25 years of experience working with the biggest retail brands in the country. Ahead of his session at this year’s Workforce Success Conference, the specialist in food retail, retail operations, and consumer behaviour sat down with Tanda to talk about staff empowerment, bending the rules a little, and doing something new. Consumer-oriented Positive Deviance Dr. Mortimer isn’t against rules. They’re integral for function. “Rules are necessary, particularly if you’re running a financial organisation or a pharmacy or a retailer. You want to ensure there are some rules in place. You want your customers to walk in and have a positive experience, but also a consistent experience across your different brands, your different businesses.” But bending the rules in service of overall productivity isn’t messing with them for the sake of it. Managers and employees need to look at what they can do to help customers, and finding a balance between rule enforcement and leniency is key. [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-u4PcnsL1hQ[/embed] He calls this “consumer-oriented positive deviance,” wherein team members are empowered enough that they can solve problems without needing a manager to sign off on every small decision. Employees enjoy this, and it results in a happier more satisfied team willing to stay longer at a job. (This topic would ring a bell to those who’ve heard his talk from last year’s Workforce Success Conference.) Not only does it same time for leaders whose schedules are full of other matters, but it’s a way of looking at running your business through a different lens--a more strategic one. “Differentiate, not demonstrate” Observing how a variety of businesses have been responding to disruption in their chosen markets, Dr. Gary Mortimer implores workers to “differentiate, not demonstrate.” Uber’s launch in Australia is a prime example of the consequences of too much demonstration: traditional taxi companies held demonstrations against the ride-hailing app’s entry, but at the end of the day it was the customers who wanted an alternative anyway. If customers clearly want the alternative, demonstrations are a negative way of responding to that challenge. That effort, according to Dr. Mortimer, could have instead been channeled into re-examining subpar business models and asking how they can differentiate moving forward: “Protest all you want, but it’s probably better to spend some positive energy looking at ‘how can I differentiate my business?’, ‘how can i understand my customers more?’” Most companies do make strides to grow with the times, but fall short because they view changes as what they’re “supposed to do” rather than sincerely believing in the changes. Mortimer gives social media customer service as one example—how many brands have accounts for show, but fail to respond when an individual actually engages with them through there? Truly differentiating your business from the rest means a commitment to thoroughly execute plans. Transforming the Retail Experience The ubiquity of e-commerce can give physical stores a run for their money. However, this has pushed certain retailers to think about inventive ways to utilise store space to keep up. Dr. Mortimer points out athleisure brand Lululemon. In theory, similar products can be found elsewhere for cheaper prices, but the brand builds loyalty by going beyond just selling products. “What they’re doing is they’re building community around their brand,” Dr. Mortimer says. They understand they can’t compete with other stores when it comes to price, so they tap into their customer base’s love for yoga and fitness instead by opening up their store after close of business and hosting free classes weekly. Entirely new businesses are sprouting to solve the problems of traditional retail companies, too. Speed is currency now that nearly every retailer has an ecommerce store, so innovative startups are utilising the gig economy to fix consumer pain points. “What we’re going to see, particularly in the retail space is that blending of physical and digital, and it has to be that way.” The Future of Australian Retail The takeaway from all of these observations? Longevity and name recall is not a savior. Many big retailers look the same to customers, so they will always tend towards the brand with the cheapest price unless it can differentiate and provide something other stores don’t have. As some retailers won’t be able to keep up with the pressure to evolve, expect rationalisation of the marketplace in 3-5 years. Downsizing, store closures, the works—and use it as motivation to push your business further.   Want to know how to empower your employees and take your business to the next level? Catch Dr. Gary Mortimer’s talk alongside other great speakers at the Workforce Success Conference 2019, to be held on the 26th of July, 2019.

Dr. Gary Mortimer on bending the rules of business

21 May 2019

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New Tanda Time Clock

Today we\'re excited to announce the upcoming release of a newly redesigned Tanda Employee Time Clock. Addressing the problem of recording accurate employee Time and Attendance is core to ensuring we service you, our customers. This is why, on the 29th of January 2019, an update to both iOS and Android will be released on the respective app stores. Any update from the app stores from the 29th of January onwards will download this new Time Clock. The new Time Clock features a bunch of improvements that are expanded upon below: A new redesign Clock breaks with break buttons Portrait & Landscape Orientation Smart shift status Facial detection Easier device reporting To get this new Time Clock now - download the Beta on both Android and iOS. Redesign New colours, new design and some obvious layout changes have been perfected and refined for this new Time Clock. A zappy keypad now sits on a deep navy background that ripples blue waves to the rounded edge of each button. Successful entry opens a vibrant and compact user interface that pops with judicious colours. A thin-blue timer encapsulates the \'close\' button and indicates when the Time Clock screen times out - gleefully sliding all contents away. Employee\'s information is smartly displayed within the shift card and clocked times are swiftly populated upon each action. This is the Time Clock of the future. Get Beta versions now. Clock Breaks with Break Buttons The Time Clock will automatically show/hide break buttons based on the Settings enabled in your My Tanda account. If your My Tanda account doesn\'t allow staff to clock breaks - your Time Clock will display just \'Clock in\' and \'Clock out\' buttons automatically. Read more on Displaying Break Buttons or our blog post on the release of multi-breaks. See it in action below: Portrait & Landscape Orientation Dock your tablet in whatever orientation suits. The new Time Clock will dock and send photos in portrait, landscape and even upside-down (charging ports are sometimes in funky spots). All features will work as expected. Smart Shift Status Knowing what stage of a shift you\'re in helps Timesheet reporting and accuracy. That\'s why we\'ve made the Time Clock smarter in detecting a shift status (whether it\'s started, on a break, near completion) to automatically render the correct button action. This will go a long way in answering common questions staff have: what button should I press? was I on a break or already clocked in? how long was the break I just took? and providing instant clarity during a shift. Facial Detection Making sure the correct staff are at work at the correct time is important for your business. Equally important is making sure the correct staff are clocking in. As an introduction for much cooler things to come, both iOS and Android support facial detection on the Time Clock. Device Reporting We want our customers to successfully manage their business, not their Tanda accounts. That\'s why we\'ve made reporting device information about your Time Clock as simple and as fast as  possible to Tanda Support and technical staff to help us assist you debug any issues. Read more about how to Send Device Info to Tanda. The Wrap This new Time Clock will provide quicker clarity to employees throughout their shift and help support the entire shift cycle. Users on Android 5.0+ and iOS Devices 9.0+ can download the Beta version right now and get clocking in. The Time Clock will be released in full for everyone on January 29th 2019 - to prepare for this release. Ensure you have: Your 8 digit setup code or login details prepared All pending clock ins sent prior to updating Read the FAQ If you have any questions, please contact support@tanda.co.

Events & Media AU Industry Insights

Domino’s and Tanda: Building the Workforces of the Future

Brisbane-based company Tanda has today announced a business partnership with Domino’s Pizza Enterprises Limited, to automate and optimise the company’s payroll process. The partnership will assist Domino’s in empowering its franchisees with the right technology and tools to efficiently manage rostering and payroll as a competitive edge. Tanda Director Tasmin Trezise said he is excited about the partnership. “Tanda is proud to be working collaboratively with Domino’s to build the future of workforce management, and this represents an exciting step towards using technology to shape enterprise workplaces,” said Mr Trezise. “Domino’s is an agile and forward-thinking company who are leading the way in terms of innovation, whether this is through their drone delivery services or re-imagining their labour supply chain management.” The partnership between the two companies will see a roll out of Tanda\'s software to over 700 stores across Australia and New Zealand. Domino’s Australia and New Zealand CEO Nick Knight said the Company was looking forward to making franchisee’s lives easier with the efficient time and attendance program. “We are always looking to use the latest innovative technology in everything that we do as a Company – this from delivery to customers and for systems and processes with franchisees,” said Mr Knight. “Rolling out Tanda in stores across Australia and New Zealand will allow our franchisees to efficiently roster and record team member’s attendance so we look forward to reaping the benefits of the innovative program.” Trezise explained that Domino’s franchisees would soon see incredible benefits after the working relationship with Tanda begins. “This partnership will empower Domino’s franchisees with a greater understanding and insight into their labour costs so they are able to make smarter and more informed business decisions whilst having comfort that their payroll complies with current awards and enterprise agreements. “The fact that Domino’s and other Australian businesses are using new technology like Tanda is a testament to Australia’s growing success as an innovative nation.” Domino’s partnership with Tanda began in the Company’s dedicated innovation space, the DLAB, which was designed to encourage out of the box thinking. From local corner cafes to global workforces, Tanda is revolutionising the world of rostering and payroll one shift at a time. About Tanda Tanda is a scalable workforce management SaaS, that is helping businesses to unlock efficiency and productivity gains through more effective labour force management. For more information, visit www.tanda.co About Domino’s Domino’s Pizza Enterprises Limited is the master franchisor for the Domino’s brand in Australia, New Zealand, Belgium, France, The Netherlands, Japan and Germany. Across these seven markets, DPE and its franchisees operate over 2,000 stores. For more information, please visit www.dominos.com.au For further information, media enquiries or images contact: Bridget Mahon Marketing Communications Officer Email: bridget@tanda.co

Editor's Picks

Industry Insights    |   

How this retailer increased profit by $8.9m from rostering more hours

There has been a lot of speculation on why we are losing retailers so fast. An interesting research piece from the US presented an alternative hypothesis that generalises the issue down to rostering for profit rather than rostering to control costs. For context – If you were given the choice of increasing revenue by 5% or reducing costs by 5% in order to create the most profitable outcome, what would choose? A “back of the hand” calculation would show that reducing costs increases profit more than the equivalent uptick in revenue. Accordingly, most retailers choose option two. This makes sense if you assume the two scenarios are independent of each other, but what if the cost was your employees? This is where the problems arise. For industries like retail, where staff have a direct impact on sales, it’s not as simple of a question as cutting costs to increase profit. In a study led by Professor Marshall Fisher from Wharton, he and his research team constructed a conceptual model from historical data to identify stores within a US-based retail chain that had the highest potential to benefit from increased labour spend. Importantly, the strategy was actually implemented at 168 retail sites over a 26-week period to validate the model, with the retailer electing to implement the strategy further. The result: A near $8.9 million increase in profit of the stores included. The labour cost challenge The challenge in allocating labour budgets lies in the tradeoff between the known immediate payroll cost and the less certain increase in sales that could be achieved with more staff on hand. The researchers point out that retail managers have a tendency to overweigh the decision to reduce the known payroll cost than the less certain increase in sales which could be achieved by allocating additional labour spend. The labour budget death spiral The study highlights the limitation of the most common retail strategy — setting labour budgets as a portion of sales. Fisher points out that this approach creates a circular problem by failing to take into account how store labour spend can positively impact sales, with the worst case leading to a spiraling effect of reduced sales forecasts reducing labour spend which reduces sales further and so on. Quantifying the impact of labour spend on revenue Creating labour budgets that are designed to maximise profit requires retailers to know on a store-by-store basis the correlation between labour-spend and sales. One way to do this is by looking at times when staffing levels deviate from the original schedule. If ten staff were scheduled on a particular day, but on that day only eight turned up, did sales also decrease by the same portion? If not, by how much? If the answer to the above is that sales didn’t decrease at all, the store is likely overstaffed. If there is a measurable impact, the inverse scenario is likely true and the store may be losing sales by being understaffed. This is the same approach used in the study, which found the relationship between random staffing deviations and impacts on sales was statistically significant. Results showed an increase in labour spend pointed to increased sales at varying degrees, depending on known store attributes. Implementing the strategy for profit The study identified stores in a US retail chain which had the highest market potential, making them good candidates for an increased labour spend. The market potential factored in attributes like average basket value and proximity to competitors, which would create scenarios that allow workers to have the highest impact on converting sales. In the study, 168 stores were selected this way, then allocated a 10% increased labour budget over a 26-week period, of which 75% of the increase was actually consumed in practice by the stores. The outcome was a 4.5% increase in revenue at the impacted stores and resulting in a near $8.9 million profit increase. Learning from the strategy The study shows empirically why the common practice of setting labour budgets as a fixed proportion of forecasted revenue is often self-defeating when applied in a retail setting. An opportunity exists to all retailers to leverage this same profit-centric model for defining labour budgets. The data required is available to all retailers however, it may just be a matter of leveraging that information with the right systems. An integrated forecasting strategy that integrates foot traffic, sales, and employee scheduling data is a practical opportunity afforded to retailers of any size to optimise their labour resource allocations. The interesting part is, Fisher’s research is readily available to all retailers who are looking to drift away from the traditional method of fixing labor budget rosters. The next step is to get this method of labour resource allocation battle tested in the Australian markets. Stay tuned. Up next: What is the Contingent Workforce and how can you leverage it in your business?

Industry Insights

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Forging the Workforce of the Future: Why frontline employees matter

Think back to the last in-store purchase you made. Were you promptly welcomed or was the store too busy for you to get their attention? Did staff assist you while you were looking for items, and given advice on deals or discounts? Was the cashier polite or uncommunicative? These small interactions with frontline employees often […]

From Hiring to Monitoring: How to use Free HR Templates and Forms

Successful workforces always have an effective HR team at the helm. They are responsible for everything from recruitment to training and development. This entails many processes and paperwork that can be too much to keep up with. In fact, creating and tracking documents is difficult without templates. Templates let you save valuable time so you […]

Awards & Rostering

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Four Ways to Keep your Managers on the Frontline

Managers juggle different roles throughout the day. They set goals, coach employees, monitor performance, and control budgets and expenses. When they don’t do it effectively, employees become frustrated and can’t perform their best. In fact, a worldwide survey revealed that 40% of employees are dissatisfied at work due to a lack of help and support […]

5 Benefits of Using Time and Attendance Software

Every year, problems with tracking time and attendance (and ultimately, wages) cause governments to apprehend and collect millions of dollars in penalties. Planning shifts, creating rosters, managing leaves, and keeping track of employees’ clock in and out are some of the most important things a business manager does on a regular basis. While some still […]

Product Updates

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Treating staff as cost centres wastes their potential for your business

What’s new in Tanda: April 2019 Every organisation needs to adapt and evolve alongside rapid changes in technology, customer attitudes, and the competition. It’s easier to do that if staff have buy-in to your business goals. And we know from plenty of case studies that treating employees like your best customer turns staff into your greatest […]

How we reduced the cost of bespoke payroll integrations to zero

From today, every payroll system you can think of, as long as it has an import function, can now work with Tanda. And it won’t cost thousands of dollars in custom integration costs. In fact, it won’t cost anything at all. Introducing Custom Export Builder With this feature, you can export all your timesheet data […]

Events & Media

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Forging the Workforce of the Future: Can you increase employee attendance?

John is 5 minutes late for work every day while his colleague Martha is late for 30 minutes once a week. Do these late clock ins really matter? For many businesses, they do. In shift work industries and frontline roles, frequent tardiness can mean disruption and loss of profit. Even just 10 minutes of being […]

Gary Johnson’s 5 Tips for Managing the Hospitality Industry

“Anywhere and everywhere you go, people need hospitality people. So it’s kind of like a ticket to ride, it gives you a fantastic experience to not only travel through different cities or countries for that matter, but along the way, you get the skills, you gather experiences, you gather knowledge,” says Gary Johnson, National Food […]

Clients & Partners

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Domino’s Israel selects Tanda for Workforce Success

Tel Aviv, Israel — Tanda is proud to announce that Domino’s Israel will roll out its innovative workforce management software to 57 locations after a successful 3-month trial. The Tanda platform will be used to manage rostering, time and attendance, and wage reporting for over 1,500 staff across Israel. Following an introduction from Domino’s Pizza […]

How to Achieve Culture by Design with Career Culture Lab’s Amanda Lutvey

“I’m passionate about developing extraordinary places to work because we spend a lot of time at work and in a number of organisations, managers just really don’t know how to design a culture,” says Amanda Lutvey, founder of Career Culture Lab. For the past twenty years, Amanda has worked with leaders and managers to transform […]

Editor's Picks

Industry Insights    |   

How this retailer increased profit by $8.9m from rostering more hours

There has been a lot of speculation on why we are losing retailers so fast. An interesting research piece from the US presented an alternative hypothesis that generalises the issue down to rostering for profit rather than rostering to control costs. For context – If you were given the choice of increasing revenue by 5% or reducing costs by 5% in order to create the most profitable outcome, what would choose? A “back of the hand” calculation would show that reducing costs increases profit more than the equivalent uptick in revenue. Accordingly, most retailers choose option two. This makes sense if you assume the two scenarios are independent of each other, but what if the cost was your employees? This is where the problems arise. For industries like retail, where staff have a direct impact on sales, it’s not as simple of a question as cutting costs to increase profit. In a study led by Professor Marshall Fisher from Wharton, he and his research team constructed a conceptual model from historical data to identify stores within a US-based retail chain that had the highest potential to benefit from increased labour spend. Importantly, the strategy was actually implemented at 168 retail sites over a 26-week period to validate the model, with the retailer electing to implement the strategy further. The result: A near $8.9 million increase in profit of the stores included. The labour cost challenge The challenge in allocating labour budgets lies in the tradeoff between the known immediate payroll cost and the less certain increase in sales that could be achieved with more staff on hand. The researchers point out that retail managers have a tendency to overweigh the decision to reduce the known payroll cost than the less certain increase in sales which could be achieved by allocating additional labour spend. The labour budget death spiral The study highlights the limitation of the most common retail strategy — setting labour budgets as a portion of sales. Fisher points out that this approach creates a circular problem by failing to take into account how store labour spend can positively impact sales, with the worst case leading to a spiraling effect of reduced sales forecasts reducing labour spend which reduces sales further and so on. Quantifying the impact of labour spend on revenue Creating labour budgets that are designed to maximise profit requires retailers to know on a store-by-store basis the correlation between labour-spend and sales. One way to do this is by looking at times when staffing levels deviate from the original schedule. If ten staff were scheduled on a particular day, but on that day only eight turned up, did sales also decrease by the same portion? If not, by how much? If the answer to the above is that sales didn’t decrease at all, the store is likely overstaffed. If there is a measurable impact, the inverse scenario is likely true and the store may be losing sales by being understaffed. This is the same approach used in the study, which found the relationship between random staffing deviations and impacts on sales was statistically significant. Results showed an increase in labour spend pointed to increased sales at varying degrees, depending on known store attributes. Implementing the strategy for profit The study identified stores in a US retail chain which had the highest market potential, making them good candidates for an increased labour spend. The market potential factored in attributes like average basket value and proximity to competitors, which would create scenarios that allow workers to have the highest impact on converting sales. In the study, 168 stores were selected this way, then allocated a 10% increased labour budget over a 26-week period, of which 75% of the increase was actually consumed in practice by the stores. The outcome was a 4.5% increase in revenue at the impacted stores and resulting in a near $8.9 million profit increase. Learning from the strategy The study shows empirically why the common practice of setting labour budgets as a fixed proportion of forecasted revenue is often self-defeating when applied in a retail setting. An opportunity exists to all retailers to leverage this same profit-centric model for defining labour budgets. The data required is available to all retailers however, it may just be a matter of leveraging that information with the right systems. An integrated forecasting strategy that integrates foot traffic, sales, and employee scheduling data is a practical opportunity afforded to retailers of any size to optimise their labour resource allocations. The interesting part is, Fisher’s research is readily available to all retailers who are looking to drift away from the traditional method of fixing labor budget rosters. The next step is to get this method of labour resource allocation battle tested in the Australian markets. Stay tuned. Up next: What is the Contingent Workforce and how can you leverage it in your business?

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