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Clients & Partners AU    |   

What do you do when the roster system you’ve been using isn’t improving productivity as much as you thought? Inala Primary Care has found a solution. The independent, not-for-profit General Practice operates in Queensland, where it serves the general public and acts as a charity for marginalised members of the local community. Their approach to workforce management and improving productivity is to check back on their core values: “We will change, learn, and grow.” From 7:30 AM to 5:00 PM each day, everyone working at Inala experiences “lots of people, lots of joyous moments, and lots of hard moments, because we’re dealing with people and their lives and helping them be the best they can be every day,” as CEO Tracey Johnson puts it. The key to keeping spirits up, maintaining a joyous atmosphere, and delivering the best possible care to patients is an interplay of culture and systems that Inala Primary Care has honed well in its 13-year history. We caught up with Tracey for a conversation about how it all comes together. Blending Culture and Systems for Better Patient Care One reason Inala Primary Care is so well-regarded is that patients trust them to invest in innovation and efficient systems continuously. A culture of systematisation is key to delivering quality care—and by utilising software which improves processes for the workforce, that enables them to tend to patients even better than before. The practice attempts to provide what patients need most, adhering closely to what medical evidence dictates.  “It means that our whole focus is around being proactive, data-driven, and doing excellent care,” Tracey says. Tanda’s roster system is one such investment they use to stay accountable for their own time. By automating schedules and time clock use, staff in the practice can maximise the time they spend doing tasks at the core of their role. It also frees practice managers from needing to chase employees down inquiring about timesheets. When employees work within their function rather than being bogged down by miscellaneous administrative tasks, the practice becomes a happier, more supportive place to work. Doing More, Spending Less As an organisation operating in Queensland’s poorest suburb, Tracey says software like Tanda is integral in keeping a balanced budget: “Funding is limited and the government is expecting general practices to do more with the Medicare dollars we can access. So one of the things that we’re really sensitive to is trying to grow our capacity to care without necessarily growing expenses in the same proportion.” Tanda’s staff roster system doesn’t just neatly organise who works where at what time. Timesheets and the live wage tracker work alongside the roster software to provide a clear picture at any moment about estimated wage costs for each shift. It keeps payroll accurate, too. Many in their workforce are in tightly regulated industries like nursing, which have strict pay and award rules. “Our intent is always to do the right thing, which is why we use so many systems to try and make sure that we’re on task and on track.” Time and Opportunities for Growth The combination of purposeful company culture and good software systems has paid off: Staff are staying long-term. Most of the team have been with the practice for more than five years, many for more than a decade. People are progressing in their careers, growing into senior leadership roles, and the practice keeps on getting better at what they’re doing. “Why would I say go and use Tanda? I think a lot of businesses spend their time working in the business. You\'ve got lots of practice managers spending hours and hours and hours and hours and hours doing payroll, rostering, and all these very tedious, repetitive tasks. Thankfully we\'re just using systems to do this stuff, which then frees up time for them to really work on the business. And by working on the business, you can generate more revenue, you can generate more staff satisfaction and generate the next great idea or the next change that\'s going to improve the organisation and help us live our purpose.” With all this in mind, what’s next for Inala Primary Care? Growth and expansion. “We’re certainly going to become multi-site. So we’re exploring other places where that vision and concept can become real.” Ready to find out how you can cut down timesheet work to just 15 minutes? Try Tanda for 14 days for free, no credit card required.

Culture and Purpose: Systematised Service at Inala Primary Care

22 November 2019

Awards & Rostering    |   

Finally, the perfect candidate just accepted the offer for a vacancy that was challenging to fill. But that’s just only half of the battle won. The other half is just about to ensue, and it begins with a very critical employee touchpoint: The onboarding process.  Onboarding new employees go way beyond the orientation and filling out of forms. It should involve a series of carefully curated steps to integrate a new member into the role, the ins and outs of your organisation, and overall company culture.  However, effective onboarding appears to be a challenge for most companies. Only 12% of employees strongly agree that their company is doing a great job of onboarding new team members, according to a Gallup study. Why Employee Onboarding Matters Depending on how good the onboarding process is, it can provide tremendous value for the organisation or can lead to disengaged staff. Here are five reasons why you should pay more attention to this step. 1. It’s cost-effective. Hiring an employee involves a lot of effort, from putting out that job ad, screening applicants, interviewing candidates, coordinating schedules to negotiating the salary and crafting the job offer. And the costs associated with all of that can be hefty.  In the US, the average cost-per-hire is around $4,129, according to a report by SHRM. While it will vary depending on position and role, cost-per-hire involves all expenses incurred to get a new employee–from HR staff rates to job advertisement fees.  A good employee onboarding process ensures that all that hard work and resources won’t go to waste.  One of the ways to minimise cost and save time is to go for paperless onboarding. It eliminates time spent on tedious steps, such as capturing employee data and filling out forms. It can also be used to send essential documents to a new hire ahead of time and allow them to submit requirements in just a few clicks. Ultimately, this helps your new employee to get going right away instead of overwhelming them with too much information and paperwork on their first day.  Read more: Onboarding: The Employer’s Checklist 2. It improves retention. Onboarding a new employee is very similar to establishing a good impression. Sure, online searches about your company can give them a glimpse of what it’s like to work for you, but the onboarding process can either exceed, meet, or worse, fall short of those expectations.  A strong onboarding process can help improve new hire retention by 82%, according to a study by the Brandon Hall Group.  Good onboarding is never a one-day affair. It goes beyond the team introductions and the welcome email. It’s a crucial phase where expectations are set, concerns are clarified, directions are given, and culture is instilled. It’s ongoing communication between the manager and the new hire to ensure that nothing important falls through the cracks. If you are unable to create this safe environment, you can be at risk of losing an employee before they can significantly contribute to your goals. In Australia, six in ten managers experience losing an employee within the probation period because of poor onboarding process. You can avoid being on of those six by re-evaluating your current system and finding ways to make it more efficient for yourself and the new staff. 3. It creates brand champions. Think about a product that you love. From the moment you tried it to the time that you wholeheartedly believe in it are all parts of your journey as a customer. You can say that the brand nurtured you in every step if you recommend the product to people within your scope of influence, like family and friends. In essence, you became an ambassador for the brand.  This cycle is similar to attracting potential employees who can be advocates for your business. In this case, you aim for a new member who will genuinely believe in your purpose and embrace your DNA as a company. Onboarding done right can make that happen. ‘Purpose’ is one of the six essential elements that define a thriving workplace culture, according to the 2020 Global Report by O.C. Tanner. It states that employees will feel more passionate about their work if they see a direct link between their individual roles and the organisation’s purpose as a whole. They need to see how their task fold into the bigger picture. When onboarding a new employee, clearly state what you stand for as an organisation and explain how the new hire can contribute to that. Provide an experience that will set the right tone early on, so you can eventually turn new members into firm believers of your brand. It will give them a far greater motivation that goes beyond getting a paycheck. Read more: Making the Onboarding Experience Work for your Business 4. It builds good reputation. An employee’s experience during onboarding, whether good or bad, can easily creep its way to review websites and social media networks, and this can affect how job seekers and clients alike perceive your organisation.  A survey from CareerArc found that 55% of job seekers stopped pursuing an application to a company after reading a negative review about the employer.  More than feeling welcome and being excited to work, a well-thought onboarding process can foster a strong feeling of pride in your new employee. When employees are proud of where they work and what they do, it can easily translate to organic and positive testimonials that strengthens your employer branding and reputation.  5. It boosts productivity. New employees tend to get overwhelmed during onboarding, especially when they try to digest a lot of information in one go, potentially affecting productivity down the road.   A good onboarding process includes a clear structure that helps new hires ease into the role and responsibilities. Managers or leads should share details only at the stages where they are essential as opposed to providing them all on day one. Doing so allows a new employee to learn faster and remember information better.  Regular check-ins also help in tracking a new employee’s progress. They help nip issues in the bud and identify areas where they need assistance or clarifications. Set the tone of transparency and helps establish open channels of communication, which are all essential to working more effectively.  Read more: Below average staff performance? Time to look at your onboarding process Employee onboarding is more than just communicating company policies, setting up workstations, and office introductions. It is a process that starts even before the first official working day of a new employee and goes on until they are fully equipped to begin contributing to your organisation’s goals.  Start improving your employee onboarding process before it’s too late. Streamline the repetitive and tedious steps like requirement submissions, filling out forms, capturing employee details, and distribution of essential company documents.  Let new hires submit all pre-employment documents and details in just a few clicks with Tanda. Save time from these manual tasks and focus on creating and optimising how you integrate new employees in your organisation and gear them up for success.  See how our paperless onboarding works and book a demo today.

Onboarding New Employees? 5 Reasons Why You Need to Do It Right

11 November 2019

Awards & Rostering    |   

When most managers think of a roster system, it’s usually just about letting staff know of hours they’re expected to work. Paul on the night shift, Sally on the morning shift, John on the weekends — how difficult is it to even make the perfect roster? Turns out, it’s extremely difficult. Why build the perfect roster in the first place? A ‘perfect roster’ can mean differently for various businesses. There is just no one size fits all when it comes to workforce schedules. Every business aims to increase their effective profit margin. More profit means more choices, more take home pay, and less ongoing risk. And the easiest way to increase profit is to reduce the largest yet most controllable expense in a company: staff wages. The roster, being a primary source of wage costs, is often overlooked as the single biggest opportunity to increase profit. Cross-industry research shows that rosters are under-optimised most of the time, making a massive difference to the bottom-line of a company. Without realising it, businesses are losing money due to poor shift planning everyday. One day of inefficient rostering can set a budget off-balance, which managers only discover when the pay period rolls in. How can managers improve their rostering system? More than setting the hours, those who oversee staff are also responsible for optimising wages. The problem is that a lot of managers are either too busy to do so, or are not equipped with the right tools to do it. We work with thousands of managers from different industries and have summarised some of the most common problems they encounter when it comes to rostering. Read more about these blockers and our tips for success. Problem #1: Manual rostering is extremely time consuming Manually writing down the hours staff are rostered is easy for a business with just three people. You put in the hours they need to show up and paste the sheet on the office bulletin board, and that’s it. Job well done, roster’s finished. But for bigger companies with hundreds and thousands of staff? Not the most ideal way to schedule employees. Scheduling will take weeks, if not months to do. The band-aid solution is to create a spreadsheet of everyone who needs to be rostered — usually via Excel or Google Sheets. Yes, this cuts down time compared to paper-based rostering, however it’s still not the most efficient way to do so. In essence, your timesheets are still being done manually this way, which makes it prone to human error and time theft. The solution: Cloud-based processes, from rostering to attendance tracking An efficient rostering software can help managers cut down the task from a couple of hours to just a few minutes. Templates have also become an efficient way to copy and paste staff’s schedules, because why do the same thing over and over again, every time? While rostering is half of the job, attendance tracking can now be automated as well. With photo- and location-verified time tracking apps, managers are saved from the guesswork of who’s worked when. Not only does this make timesheet approvals a seamless process, it also prevents time and wage theft on a bigger scale. Problem #2: It’s tricky to communicate with staff regarding their roster You’ve created the perfect roster; now you need to tell your staff. But what’s the best avenue to do so? Through face-to-face interaction? Mass messaging? Printing it out? Not only does choosing a platform become potentially exhausting, it can also become confusing for staff to keep up with where to really check their schedules. One missed message and an entire team’s schedule could go downhill, lowering productivity and service quality for the day. The solution: Communication tools readily available within the rostering system While a good rostering software is still seen as a tool that communicates only start and end times, managers can actually use it as a messaging tool for everything to do with shifts — not just when to start and when to end. Communication or the lack thereof can cause a lot of missed shifts and misunderstandings at work. By having built-in tools in your rostering system, letting people know when they’re expected to work becomes a natural next step than anything. It’s a lot easier for managers and staff alike to have a messaging feature within their scheduling app, directly asking one another about rosters in real-time. Some apps such as Workplace by Facebook also started integrating workforce management tools within their system. Problem #3: Rostering becomes complex when industry awards come into play With the recent high profile cases of underpayments such as George Calombaris and Subway Australia, fear of penalties in following labour regulations have become universal across many businesses. While this seems to be happening more often than usual, most cases are probably unintentional. The tension here lies in the difficulty of keeping up with requirements as managers roster their staff. It’s a risky game to play when you’re never 100% sure you’re still compliant when rostering employees. This complexity heavily applies for overtime, weekends, and public holidays. Of course, calculations become a bit more of a puzzle when the type of employment is taken into account, as well as respective qualifications for every shift worked. And with specific pay rates being regularly updated by the government, employers need to take extra care ensuring that the rules they’re implementing are still relevant. The solution: Automated pay rule updates and direct-to-payroll calculations Managers shouldn’t have to sit down and read through legal jargon just to roster staff. A software that automatically updates pay rates based on industry updates (or even custom EBAs, depending on the business) is the most helpful and effortless solution. It saves managers from the complexity of computing rates per employee, and avoiding legal apprehension in the long run. When everything is automated, you can focus on creating the perfect roster without having to worry about the compliance side of things.   In conclusion, the best way to optimise your rostering process is to leave it to a trusted software to take care of everything. With workforce management software such as Tanda, rostering becomes a breeze, and everything else — attendance, timesheets, unavailability, shift swapping, and payroll processing — all happens in one place. To make rostering an effortless task, try Tanda for free today.

3 Common Rostering Problems Managers Face (And How to Solve Them)

25 October 2019

Clients & Partners AU    |   

What do you do when the roster system you’ve been using isn’t improving productivity as much as you thought? Inala Primary Care has found a solution. The independent, not-for-profit General Practice operates in Queensland, where it serves the general public and acts as a charity for marginalised members of the local community. Their approach to workforce management and improving productivity is to check back on their core values: “We will change, learn, and grow.” From 7:30 AM to 5:00 PM each day, everyone working at Inala experiences “lots of people, lots of joyous moments, and lots of hard moments, because we’re dealing with people and their lives and helping them be the best they can be every day,” as CEO Tracey Johnson puts it. The key to keeping spirits up, maintaining a joyous atmosphere, and delivering the best possible care to patients is an interplay of culture and systems that Inala Primary Care has honed well in its 13-year history. We caught up with Tracey for a conversation about how it all comes together. Blending Culture and Systems for Better Patient Care One reason Inala Primary Care is so well-regarded is that patients trust them to invest in innovation and efficient systems continuously. A culture of systematisation is key to delivering quality care—and by utilising software which improves processes for the workforce, that enables them to tend to patients even better than before. The practice attempts to provide what patients need most, adhering closely to what medical evidence dictates.  “It means that our whole focus is around being proactive, data-driven, and doing excellent care,” Tracey says. Tanda’s roster system is one such investment they use to stay accountable for their own time. By automating schedules and time clock use, staff in the practice can maximise the time they spend doing tasks at the core of their role. It also frees practice managers from needing to chase employees down inquiring about timesheets. When employees work within their function rather than being bogged down by miscellaneous administrative tasks, the practice becomes a happier, more supportive place to work. Doing More, Spending Less As an organisation operating in Queensland’s poorest suburb, Tracey says software like Tanda is integral in keeping a balanced budget: “Funding is limited and the government is expecting general practices to do more with the Medicare dollars we can access. So one of the things that we’re really sensitive to is trying to grow our capacity to care without necessarily growing expenses in the same proportion.” Tanda’s staff roster system doesn’t just neatly organise who works where at what time. Timesheets and the live wage tracker work alongside the roster software to provide a clear picture at any moment about estimated wage costs for each shift. It keeps payroll accurate, too. Many in their workforce are in tightly regulated industries like nursing, which have strict pay and award rules. “Our intent is always to do the right thing, which is why we use so many systems to try and make sure that we’re on task and on track.” Time and Opportunities for Growth The combination of purposeful company culture and good software systems has paid off: Staff are staying long-term. Most of the team have been with the practice for more than five years, many for more than a decade. People are progressing in their careers, growing into senior leadership roles, and the practice keeps on getting better at what they’re doing. “Why would I say go and use Tanda? I think a lot of businesses spend their time working in the business. You\'ve got lots of practice managers spending hours and hours and hours and hours and hours doing payroll, rostering, and all these very tedious, repetitive tasks. Thankfully we\'re just using systems to do this stuff, which then frees up time for them to really work on the business. And by working on the business, you can generate more revenue, you can generate more staff satisfaction and generate the next great idea or the next change that\'s going to improve the organisation and help us live our purpose.” With all this in mind, what’s next for Inala Primary Care? Growth and expansion. “We’re certainly going to become multi-site. So we’re exploring other places where that vision and concept can become real.” Ready to find out how you can cut down timesheet work to just 15 minutes? Try Tanda for 14 days for free, no credit card required.

Culture and Purpose: Systematised Service at Inala Primary Care

22 November 2019

Awards & Rostering    |   

Finally, the perfect candidate just accepted the offer for a vacancy that was challenging to fill. But that’s just only half of the battle won. The other half is just about to ensue, and it begins with a very critical employee touchpoint: The onboarding process.  Onboarding new employees go way beyond the orientation and filling out of forms. It should involve a series of carefully curated steps to integrate a new member into the role, the ins and outs of your organisation, and overall company culture.  However, effective onboarding appears to be a challenge for most companies. Only 12% of employees strongly agree that their company is doing a great job of onboarding new team members, according to a Gallup study. Why Employee Onboarding Matters Depending on how good the onboarding process is, it can provide tremendous value for the organisation or can lead to disengaged staff. Here are five reasons why you should pay more attention to this step. 1. It’s cost-effective. Hiring an employee involves a lot of effort, from putting out that job ad, screening applicants, interviewing candidates, coordinating schedules to negotiating the salary and crafting the job offer. And the costs associated with all of that can be hefty.  In the US, the average cost-per-hire is around $4,129, according to a report by SHRM. While it will vary depending on position and role, cost-per-hire involves all expenses incurred to get a new employee–from HR staff rates to job advertisement fees.  A good employee onboarding process ensures that all that hard work and resources won’t go to waste.  One of the ways to minimise cost and save time is to go for paperless onboarding. It eliminates time spent on tedious steps, such as capturing employee data and filling out forms. It can also be used to send essential documents to a new hire ahead of time and allow them to submit requirements in just a few clicks. Ultimately, this helps your new employee to get going right away instead of overwhelming them with too much information and paperwork on their first day.  Read more: Onboarding: The Employer’s Checklist 2. It improves retention. Onboarding a new employee is very similar to establishing a good impression. Sure, online searches about your company can give them a glimpse of what it’s like to work for you, but the onboarding process can either exceed, meet, or worse, fall short of those expectations.  A strong onboarding process can help improve new hire retention by 82%, according to a study by the Brandon Hall Group.  Good onboarding is never a one-day affair. It goes beyond the team introductions and the welcome email. It’s a crucial phase where expectations are set, concerns are clarified, directions are given, and culture is instilled. It’s ongoing communication between the manager and the new hire to ensure that nothing important falls through the cracks. If you are unable to create this safe environment, you can be at risk of losing an employee before they can significantly contribute to your goals. In Australia, six in ten managers experience losing an employee within the probation period because of poor onboarding process. You can avoid being on of those six by re-evaluating your current system and finding ways to make it more efficient for yourself and the new staff. 3. It creates brand champions. Think about a product that you love. From the moment you tried it to the time that you wholeheartedly believe in it are all parts of your journey as a customer. You can say that the brand nurtured you in every step if you recommend the product to people within your scope of influence, like family and friends. In essence, you became an ambassador for the brand.  This cycle is similar to attracting potential employees who can be advocates for your business. In this case, you aim for a new member who will genuinely believe in your purpose and embrace your DNA as a company. Onboarding done right can make that happen. ‘Purpose’ is one of the six essential elements that define a thriving workplace culture, according to the 2020 Global Report by O.C. Tanner. It states that employees will feel more passionate about their work if they see a direct link between their individual roles and the organisation’s purpose as a whole. They need to see how their task fold into the bigger picture. When onboarding a new employee, clearly state what you stand for as an organisation and explain how the new hire can contribute to that. Provide an experience that will set the right tone early on, so you can eventually turn new members into firm believers of your brand. It will give them a far greater motivation that goes beyond getting a paycheck. Read more: Making the Onboarding Experience Work for your Business 4. It builds good reputation. An employee’s experience during onboarding, whether good or bad, can easily creep its way to review websites and social media networks, and this can affect how job seekers and clients alike perceive your organisation.  A survey from CareerArc found that 55% of job seekers stopped pursuing an application to a company after reading a negative review about the employer.  More than feeling welcome and being excited to work, a well-thought onboarding process can foster a strong feeling of pride in your new employee. When employees are proud of where they work and what they do, it can easily translate to organic and positive testimonials that strengthens your employer branding and reputation.  5. It boosts productivity. New employees tend to get overwhelmed during onboarding, especially when they try to digest a lot of information in one go, potentially affecting productivity down the road.   A good onboarding process includes a clear structure that helps new hires ease into the role and responsibilities. Managers or leads should share details only at the stages where they are essential as opposed to providing them all on day one. Doing so allows a new employee to learn faster and remember information better.  Regular check-ins also help in tracking a new employee’s progress. They help nip issues in the bud and identify areas where they need assistance or clarifications. Set the tone of transparency and helps establish open channels of communication, which are all essential to working more effectively.  Read more: Below average staff performance? Time to look at your onboarding process Employee onboarding is more than just communicating company policies, setting up workstations, and office introductions. It is a process that starts even before the first official working day of a new employee and goes on until they are fully equipped to begin contributing to your organisation’s goals.  Start improving your employee onboarding process before it’s too late. Streamline the repetitive and tedious steps like requirement submissions, filling out forms, capturing employee details, and distribution of essential company documents.  Let new hires submit all pre-employment documents and details in just a few clicks with Tanda. Save time from these manual tasks and focus on creating and optimising how you integrate new employees in your organisation and gear them up for success.  See how our paperless onboarding works and book a demo today.

Onboarding New Employees? 5 Reasons Why You Need to Do It Right

11 November 2019

Awards & Rostering    |   

When most managers think of a roster system, it’s usually just about letting staff know of hours they’re expected to work. Paul on the night shift, Sally on the morning shift, John on the weekends — how difficult is it to even make the perfect roster? Turns out, it’s extremely difficult. Why build the perfect roster in the first place? A ‘perfect roster’ can mean differently for various businesses. There is just no one size fits all when it comes to workforce schedules. Every business aims to increase their effective profit margin. More profit means more choices, more take home pay, and less ongoing risk. And the easiest way to increase profit is to reduce the largest yet most controllable expense in a company: staff wages. The roster, being a primary source of wage costs, is often overlooked as the single biggest opportunity to increase profit. Cross-industry research shows that rosters are under-optimised most of the time, making a massive difference to the bottom-line of a company. Without realising it, businesses are losing money due to poor shift planning everyday. One day of inefficient rostering can set a budget off-balance, which managers only discover when the pay period rolls in. How can managers improve their rostering system? More than setting the hours, those who oversee staff are also responsible for optimising wages. The problem is that a lot of managers are either too busy to do so, or are not equipped with the right tools to do it. We work with thousands of managers from different industries and have summarised some of the most common problems they encounter when it comes to rostering. Read more about these blockers and our tips for success. Problem #1: Manual rostering is extremely time consuming Manually writing down the hours staff are rostered is easy for a business with just three people. You put in the hours they need to show up and paste the sheet on the office bulletin board, and that’s it. Job well done, roster’s finished. But for bigger companies with hundreds and thousands of staff? Not the most ideal way to schedule employees. Scheduling will take weeks, if not months to do. The band-aid solution is to create a spreadsheet of everyone who needs to be rostered — usually via Excel or Google Sheets. Yes, this cuts down time compared to paper-based rostering, however it’s still not the most efficient way to do so. In essence, your timesheets are still being done manually this way, which makes it prone to human error and time theft. The solution: Cloud-based processes, from rostering to attendance tracking An efficient rostering software can help managers cut down the task from a couple of hours to just a few minutes. Templates have also become an efficient way to copy and paste staff’s schedules, because why do the same thing over and over again, every time? While rostering is half of the job, attendance tracking can now be automated as well. With photo- and location-verified time tracking apps, managers are saved from the guesswork of who’s worked when. Not only does this make timesheet approvals a seamless process, it also prevents time and wage theft on a bigger scale. Problem #2: It’s tricky to communicate with staff regarding their roster You’ve created the perfect roster; now you need to tell your staff. But what’s the best avenue to do so? Through face-to-face interaction? Mass messaging? Printing it out? Not only does choosing a platform become potentially exhausting, it can also become confusing for staff to keep up with where to really check their schedules. One missed message and an entire team’s schedule could go downhill, lowering productivity and service quality for the day. The solution: Communication tools readily available within the rostering system While a good rostering software is still seen as a tool that communicates only start and end times, managers can actually use it as a messaging tool for everything to do with shifts — not just when to start and when to end. Communication or the lack thereof can cause a lot of missed shifts and misunderstandings at work. By having built-in tools in your rostering system, letting people know when they’re expected to work becomes a natural next step than anything. It’s a lot easier for managers and staff alike to have a messaging feature within their scheduling app, directly asking one another about rosters in real-time. Some apps such as Workplace by Facebook also started integrating workforce management tools within their system. Problem #3: Rostering becomes complex when industry awards come into play With the recent high profile cases of underpayments such as George Calombaris and Subway Australia, fear of penalties in following labour regulations have become universal across many businesses. While this seems to be happening more often than usual, most cases are probably unintentional. The tension here lies in the difficulty of keeping up with requirements as managers roster their staff. It’s a risky game to play when you’re never 100% sure you’re still compliant when rostering employees. This complexity heavily applies for overtime, weekends, and public holidays. Of course, calculations become a bit more of a puzzle when the type of employment is taken into account, as well as respective qualifications for every shift worked. And with specific pay rates being regularly updated by the government, employers need to take extra care ensuring that the rules they’re implementing are still relevant. The solution: Automated pay rule updates and direct-to-payroll calculations Managers shouldn’t have to sit down and read through legal jargon just to roster staff. A software that automatically updates pay rates based on industry updates (or even custom EBAs, depending on the business) is the most helpful and effortless solution. It saves managers from the complexity of computing rates per employee, and avoiding legal apprehension in the long run. When everything is automated, you can focus on creating the perfect roster without having to worry about the compliance side of things.   In conclusion, the best way to optimise your rostering process is to leave it to a trusted software to take care of everything. With workforce management software such as Tanda, rostering becomes a breeze, and everything else — attendance, timesheets, unavailability, shift swapping, and payroll processing — all happens in one place. To make rostering an effortless task, try Tanda for free today.

3 Common Rostering Problems Managers Face (And How to Solve Them)

25 October 2019

Most Popular

Awards & Rostering

What you need to know about the Casual Conversion Clause

On 1 October 2018, the Fair Work Commission announced that a new casual conversion clause will be included in 80+ modern awards across Australia. What does it mean? Casual conversion is a right given to regular casual staff to request for full-time or part-time employment status, given certain prerequisites. In the awards, a ‘regular casual employee’ is: “A casual employee who has, in the preceding period of 12 months, worked a pattern of hours on an ongoing basis which, without significant adjustment, the employee could continue to perform as a full-time employee or part-time employee under the provisions of this award.” Businesses whose awards fall under mandate are required to advise their casual employees of this clause. This does not require employers to offer conversion to their eligible employees; rather, the clause entitles all eligible employees the right to request for conversion. Who can apply? The clause allows casual workers to apply for conversion if: They have  been working for the business for twelve (12) months; and Their work pattern is an ongoing number of hours over the past year, which can be continued without adjustment upon conversion to full-time or part-time. Employers must provide casual employees with a copy of the casual conversion clause within their first year of initial engagement with the business. Casual employees who are eligible to apply should request their employers in writing. Can applications be rejected? Yes, applications can be rejected. Reasonable grounds include: A significant adjustment of work hours for the employee in order to accommodate their full-time or part-time employment status; The employee worked for short periods and/or irregular shifts or hours; and The position of the casual employee will cease to exist in the foreseeable future. Rejection of applications can be done, given that both employee and employer have discussed the decision. Should employers not convert a casual employee, a written refusal must be provided, indicating the reasonable grounds of rejection. Read more: What is the Contingent Workforce and how can you leverage it in your business? What awards are covered? The introduction of the clause covers 80+ modern awards, including: Hospitality Industry (General) Award 2010; Food, Beverage and Tobacco Manufacturing Award 2010; Manufacturing and Associated Industries and Occupations Award 2010; Building & Construction General On-site Award 2010; Concrete Products Award 2010; Electrical, Electronic & Communications Contracting Award 2010; Graphic Arts, Printing and Publishing Award 2010; Plumbing and Fire Sprinklers Award 2010; Textile, Clothing, Footwear and Associated Industries Award 2010; and Vehicle Manufacturing, Repair, Services and Retail Award 2010 To check if your business is included, click here. What should your business do next? It’s important to keep in mind that Fair Work’s decision does not require businesses to convert casual employees in all cases where a casual employee makes a request for conversion to their employer.  For this reason, it’s important to understand the criteria for casual conversion and understand what your obligations are when employees meet these requirements. If you or your business falls under the new clause, here are the steps you can take to stay compliant: Check your modern award or enterprise agreement. Awards with existing clauses for casual conversion may have different requirements. Check your award for the exact rules in your industry. Create a casual conversion letter. You can also download a copy here. Notify your employees. Make sure you give your casual staff (employed as of 1 October 2018) a copy of the final letter. Record the outcome of the casual conversion offer. Whether they accept or reject the offer, keep copies of their written responses for future reference. If you are unsure how the casual conversion clause affects your business, call the Fair Work Infoline on 13 13 94 or visit www.fairwork.gov.au To make sure you stay updated with the latest news on awards, employment, and compliance, subscribe to our newsletter today.

Product Updates

Domino’s and Tanda: Building the Workforces of the Future

Brisbane-based company Tanda has today announced a business partnership with Domino’s Pizza Enterprises Limited, to automate and optimise the company’s payroll process. The partnership will assist Domino’s in empowering its franchisees with the right technology and tools to efficiently manage rostering and payroll as a competitive edge. Tanda Director Tasmin Trezise said he is excited about the partnership. “Tanda is proud to be working collaboratively with Domino’s to build the future of workforce management, and this represents an exciting step towards using technology to shape enterprise workplaces,” said Mr Trezise. “Domino’s is an agile and forward-thinking company who are leading the way in terms of innovation, whether this is through their drone delivery services or re-imagining their labour supply chain management.” The partnership between the two companies will see a roll out of Tanda\'s software to over 700 stores across Australia and New Zealand. Domino’s Australia and New Zealand CEO Nick Knight said the Company was looking forward to making franchisee’s lives easier with the efficient time and attendance program. “We are always looking to use the latest innovative technology in everything that we do as a Company – this from delivery to customers and for systems and processes with franchisees,” said Mr Knight. “Rolling out Tanda in stores across Australia and New Zealand will allow our franchisees to efficiently roster and record team member’s attendance so we look forward to reaping the benefits of the innovative program.” Trezise explained that Domino’s franchisees would soon see incredible benefits after the working relationship with Tanda begins. “This partnership will empower Domino’s franchisees with a greater understanding and insight into their labour costs so they are able to make smarter and more informed business decisions whilst having comfort that their payroll complies with current awards and enterprise agreements. “The fact that Domino’s and other Australian businesses are using new technology like Tanda is a testament to Australia’s growing success as an innovative nation.” Domino’s partnership with Tanda began in the Company’s dedicated innovation space, the DLAB, which was designed to encourage out of the box thinking. From local corner cafes to global workforces, Tanda is revolutionising the world of rostering and payroll one shift at a time. About Tanda Tanda is a scalable workforce management SaaS, that is helping businesses to unlock efficiency and productivity gains through more effective labour force management. For more information, visit www.tanda.co About Domino’s Domino’s Pizza Enterprises Limited is the master franchisor for the Domino’s brand in Australia, New Zealand, Belgium, France, The Netherlands, Japan and Germany. Across these seven markets, DPE and its franchisees operate over 2,000 stores. For more information, please visit www.dominos.com.au For further information, media enquiries or images contact: Bridget Mahon Marketing Communications Officer Email: bridget@tanda.co

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Industry Insights    |   

How this retailer increased profit by $8.9m from rostering more hours

There has been a lot of speculation on why we are losing retailers so fast. An interesting research piece from the US presented an alternative hypothesis that generalises the issue down to rostering for profit rather than rostering to control costs. For context – If you were given the choice of increasing revenue by 5% or reducing costs by 5% in order to create the most profitable outcome, what would choose? A “back of the hand” calculation would show that reducing costs increases profit more than the equivalent uptick in revenue. Accordingly, most retailers choose option two. This makes sense if you assume the two scenarios are independent of each other, but what if the cost was your employees? This is where the problems arise. For industries like retail, where staff have a direct impact on sales, it’s not as simple of a question as cutting costs to increase profit. In a study led by Professor Marshall Fisher from Wharton, he and his research team constructed a conceptual model from historical data to identify stores within a US-based retail chain that had the highest potential to benefit from increased labour spend. Importantly, the strategy was actually implemented at 168 retail sites over a 26-week period to validate the model, with the retailer electing to implement the strategy further. The result: A near $8.9 million increase in profit of the stores included. The labour cost challenge The challenge in allocating labour budgets lies in the tradeoff between the known immediate payroll cost and the less certain increase in sales that could be achieved with more staff on hand. The researchers point out that retail managers have a tendency to overweigh the decision to reduce the known payroll cost than the less certain increase in sales which could be achieved by allocating additional labour spend. The labour budget death spiral The study highlights the limitation of the most common retail strategy — setting labour budgets as a portion of sales. Fisher points out that this approach creates a circular problem by failing to take into account how store labour spend can positively impact sales, with the worst case leading to a spiraling effect of reduced sales forecasts reducing labour spend which reduces sales further and so on. Quantifying the impact of labour spend on revenue Creating labour budgets that are designed to maximise profit requires retailers to know on a store-by-store basis the correlation between labour-spend and sales. One way to do this is by looking at times when staffing levels deviate from the original schedule. If ten staff were scheduled on a particular day, but on that day only eight turned up, did sales also decrease by the same portion? If not, by how much? If the answer to the above is that sales didn’t decrease at all, the store is likely overstaffed. If there is a measurable impact, the inverse scenario is likely true and the store may be losing sales by being understaffed. This is the same approach used in the study, which found the relationship between random staffing deviations and impacts on sales was statistically significant. Results showed an increase in labour spend pointed to increased sales at varying degrees, depending on known store attributes. Implementing the strategy for profit The study identified stores in a US retail chain which had the highest market potential, making them good candidates for an increased labour spend. The market potential factored in attributes like average basket value and proximity to competitors, which would create scenarios that allow workers to have the highest impact on converting sales. In the study, 168 stores were selected this way, then allocated a 10% increased labour budget over a 26-week period, of which 75% of the increase was actually consumed in practice by the stores. The outcome was a 4.5% increase in revenue at the impacted stores and resulting in a near $8.9 million profit increase. Learning from the strategy The study shows empirically why the common practice of setting labour budgets as a fixed proportion of forecasted revenue is often self-defeating when applied in a retail setting. An opportunity exists to all retailers to leverage this same profit-centric model for defining labour budgets. The data required is available to all retailers however, it may just be a matter of leveraging that information with the right systems. An integrated forecasting strategy that integrates foot traffic, sales, and employee scheduling data is a practical opportunity afforded to retailers of any size to optimise their labour resource allocations. The interesting part is, Fisher’s research is readily available to all retailers who are looking to drift away from the traditional method of fixing labor budget rosters. The next step is to get this method of labour resource allocation battle tested in the Australian markets. Stay tuned. Up next: What is the Contingent Workforce and how can you leverage it in your business?

Industry Insights

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Ensuring a Seamless Adoption of New Technology Among Frontline Employees

Technology as a business necessity In 2017, nearly half of all Australian innovation-active businesses spent on new equipment or technology, making tech the most common innovation expenditure — and rightly so. Technology has become a necessity for businesses everywhere, and the most competitive companies are always looking to upgrade theirs to improve productivity. However, it’s important […]

June 30 Reminder: Check your Superannuation Contributions!

Superannuation underpayment is a significant problem in Australia. An estimated 2.85 million Australians are being short-changed. On average, they have 50% less in their super balances than those who are being paid correctly. Further, analysis of ATO data has shown that the average underpayment is $2,070 — that’s $80 per fortnightly pay. Young, blue-collar workers […]

Awards & Rostering

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Onboarding New Employees? 5 Reasons Why You Need to Do It Right

Finally, the perfect candidate just accepted the offer for a vacancy that was challenging to fill. But that’s just only half of the battle won. The other half is just about to ensue, and it begins with a very critical employee touchpoint: The onboarding process.  Onboarding new employees go way beyond the orientation and filling […]

3 Common Rostering Problems Managers Face (And How to Solve Them)

When most managers think of a roster system, it’s usually just about letting staff know of hours they’re expected to work. Paul on the night shift, Sally on the morning shift, John on the weekends — how difficult is it to even make the perfect roster? Turns out, it’s extremely difficult. Why build the perfect […]

Product Updates

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Announcing the brand-new Rosters upgrade.

What is happening and when? Starting on 18 October 2019, we will roll out New Rosters to selected accounts. We’re starting with customers who we know will benefit from Fortnightly View — based on the way their rosters are structured. You are part of the initial rollout if… …you receive an email from us about […]

Three ways to run a perfect shift (that aren’t clocking in and out).

Communication leads to perfection. SMS, calls, FaceTime, face-to-face, WhatsApp, and time and attendance (T&A) all have one thing in common. They are used to send and receive messages. The communication gets especially more complex with T&A. Whenever you log in, you build and publish rosters. You ask for staff details during onboarding. You receive leave […]

Events & Media

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How to Communicate as a Leader with William Gooderson

“Staff members have good and bad days. We need to adjust. There will be times when there is a short deadline. We need to drive and lead because we are the team leader. There will be times when you’ve got the flexibility to take staff on a journey,” says leadership expert William Gooderson of PwC. […]

Forging the Workforce of the Future: Can you increase employee attendance?

John is 5 minutes late for work every day while his colleague Martha is late for 30 minutes once a week. Do these late clock ins really matter? For many businesses, they do. In shift work industries and frontline roles, frequent tardiness can mean disruption and loss of profit. Even just 10 minutes of being […]

Clients & Partners

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Culture and Purpose: Systematised Service at Inala Primary Care

What do you do when the roster system you’ve been using isn’t improving productivity as much as you thought? Inala Primary Care has found a solution. The independent, not-for-profit General Practice operates in Queensland, where it serves the general public and acts as a charity for marginalised members of the local community. Their approach to […]

HideAWAY Handmade Scrubs Up their Scheduling with Tanda

Artisan beauty goods company HideAWAY Handmade knows what it means for products to be made with love. Named for Hideaway Bay in Queensland where founders Wendy Campbell and Bruce Arms became engaged, the popular online brand crafts artisan personal care products such as whipped soaps, bar soaps, body custards, scrubs, and other bath time treats—all […]

Editor's Picks

Industry Insights    |   

How this retailer increased profit by $8.9m from rostering more hours

There has been a lot of speculation on why we are losing retailers so fast. An interesting research piece from the US presented an alternative hypothesis that generalises the issue down to rostering for profit rather than rostering to control costs. For context – If you were given the choice of increasing revenue by 5% or reducing costs by 5% in order to create the most profitable outcome, what would choose? A “back of the hand” calculation would show that reducing costs increases profit more than the equivalent uptick in revenue. Accordingly, most retailers choose option two. This makes sense if you assume the two scenarios are independent of each other, but what if the cost was your employees? This is where the problems arise. For industries like retail, where staff have a direct impact on sales, it’s not as simple of a question as cutting costs to increase profit. In a study led by Professor Marshall Fisher from Wharton, he and his research team constructed a conceptual model from historical data to identify stores within a US-based retail chain that had the highest potential to benefit from increased labour spend. Importantly, the strategy was actually implemented at 168 retail sites over a 26-week period to validate the model, with the retailer electing to implement the strategy further. The result: A near $8.9 million increase in profit of the stores included. The labour cost challenge The challenge in allocating labour budgets lies in the tradeoff between the known immediate payroll cost and the less certain increase in sales that could be achieved with more staff on hand. The researchers point out that retail managers have a tendency to overweigh the decision to reduce the known payroll cost than the less certain increase in sales which could be achieved by allocating additional labour spend. The labour budget death spiral The study highlights the limitation of the most common retail strategy — setting labour budgets as a portion of sales. Fisher points out that this approach creates a circular problem by failing to take into account how store labour spend can positively impact sales, with the worst case leading to a spiraling effect of reduced sales forecasts reducing labour spend which reduces sales further and so on. Quantifying the impact of labour spend on revenue Creating labour budgets that are designed to maximise profit requires retailers to know on a store-by-store basis the correlation between labour-spend and sales. One way to do this is by looking at times when staffing levels deviate from the original schedule. If ten staff were scheduled on a particular day, but on that day only eight turned up, did sales also decrease by the same portion? If not, by how much? If the answer to the above is that sales didn’t decrease at all, the store is likely overstaffed. If there is a measurable impact, the inverse scenario is likely true and the store may be losing sales by being understaffed. This is the same approach used in the study, which found the relationship between random staffing deviations and impacts on sales was statistically significant. Results showed an increase in labour spend pointed to increased sales at varying degrees, depending on known store attributes. Implementing the strategy for profit The study identified stores in a US retail chain which had the highest market potential, making them good candidates for an increased labour spend. The market potential factored in attributes like average basket value and proximity to competitors, which would create scenarios that allow workers to have the highest impact on converting sales. In the study, 168 stores were selected this way, then allocated a 10% increased labour budget over a 26-week period, of which 75% of the increase was actually consumed in practice by the stores. The outcome was a 4.5% increase in revenue at the impacted stores and resulting in a near $8.9 million profit increase. Learning from the strategy The study shows empirically why the common practice of setting labour budgets as a fixed proportion of forecasted revenue is often self-defeating when applied in a retail setting. An opportunity exists to all retailers to leverage this same profit-centric model for defining labour budgets. The data required is available to all retailers however, it may just be a matter of leveraging that information with the right systems. An integrated forecasting strategy that integrates foot traffic, sales, and employee scheduling data is a practical opportunity afforded to retailers of any size to optimise their labour resource allocations. The interesting part is, Fisher’s research is readily available to all retailers who are looking to drift away from the traditional method of fixing labor budget rosters. The next step is to get this method of labour resource allocation battle tested in the Australian markets. Stay tuned. Up next: What is the Contingent Workforce and how can you leverage it in your business?

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