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Awards & Rostering    |   

Millions are being poured into locations around Australia as hospitality and tourism infrastructure projects aim to create thousands of new jobs and improve each city’s economy. But expensive new buildings may not be enough to attract local talent. According to projections from the annual National Skills Week in 2017, waiters, chefs, bar attendants and baristas, cafe and restaurant managers, and event organisers are all in high demand in the industry.  So how can we combat this, get more talent interested in hospitality, and improve retention? One way is for human resources leaders to turn to technology. Employers need to preserve a sense of connectivity between individuals while avoiding fostering an environment that encourages them always to be “on.”  Technology for a new workforce Why does good use of technology, especially a roster system, matter in hospitality?  It’s well-known that youth populate the industry. Many young people enter the workforce part-time while studying, with hospitality being their most likely choice. However, less and less young people are opting to stay afterwards. In this case, going digital matters—Generation Z’s entrance into the workforce has shown they’re vastly different from millennials, caring even more about technology, diversity, and money.  This is good: Gen Z employees can help solve age-old problems with a new perspective and can push businesses to innovate further. But to hold and keep their attention, you need digital tools. Hospitality businesses need to prove they not only invest in the people they recruit but also in the technology they use. Benefits of a hospitality roster system  HR technology solutions employed in many companies, unfortunately, don’t centre around the employee experience, but rather management’s. According to SAP researcher Gabby Burlacu, “Their job is not to complete a goal plan or fill out a self-evaluation of their performance, engage in learning and development courses, complete an engagement survey or any of the other HR-type tasks employees are frequently asked to do. But to many employees, it probably feels like HR thinks that is their job.” On an HR professional’s end, it could look like everything they need, organised in one convenient place. On an employee’s end, it could just be a mess. What people need out of a roster system now isn’t purely business process automation. Technology now needs to substantially improve the employee experience in a people-centric, flexible, and holistic manner, according to Burlacu. If a workforce platform provides this, benefits follow. Attendance Frequent tardiness, although initially small, can add up. In the frontline and shift worker heavy hospitality industry, tardiness can mean not just a wrench in the day’s roster, but loss of profit as well. Even the shortest tardy times can accumulate and impact the bottom line. Using a roster system that accurately tracks time and attendance can identify who these individuals are so that you can address their pain points immediately. Systems also protect your business from time theft with the bonus of saving processing time. Read more: Should you approve shift swaps at work? Productivity According to HR Technology News, a new Forrester study revealed that tech expenses have increased, but productivity gains usually associated with adopting tech have flatlined. While there’s no doubt proper utilisation of HR technology results in better productivity, instead of just using potential productivity to decide on a technology solution to use, look at overall business effectiveness instead. Software that can facilitate better communication among managers and employees, for example, isn’t necessarily a productivity solution but contributes significantly to improving the work environment.  Work-Life Balance A proper rostering software has the potential to improve employees’ work-life balance if it allows them more flexibility with their schedule. Plus, if it has the capability, seeing their potential benefits, leaves, and wages in one place gives them an accurate perspective of wages, enabling them to budget more. A roster system that allows for requests for shift swapping and unavailability markers (especially for those studying or attending to other responsibilities regularly) ensures employers don’t overstep.  Read more: 3 Ways Online Rostering Software Helps Businesses These are just a few of the benefits technology can provide for the hospitality industry. However, in such a customer-centric industry, HR professionals and hospitality leaders must not overlook how technology should augment and aid the human value of their workforce, and not replace it. Rote, repetitive, and inefficient manual tasks may be streamlined, but ultimately providing the best customer experience through human interaction is what the industry is all about. Making this easier for your employees to achieve will make overall business easier, too.    Tanda’s rostering system integrates seamlessly with other features to streamline workforce management and free up time for core business tasks. Give it a try today. No credit card required.

A Roster System’s Role in Revitalising Australian Hospitality

24 February 2020

Clients & Partners AU    |   

“We help busy doctors manage thriving practices.” When you visit Hoxton Medical Practice Management (MPM)’s website, that’s the first slogan you’ll see. A company focused on relieving pressures off of practitioners’ minds, this company based in Hampton East, VIC, Australia offers expertise ranging from virtual reception services down to medical billing support. But with several facilities on-hand means hiring people with different skills who work varying hours. While Hoxton MPM is completely dedicated in providing their clients 100% peace of mind, manual administrative work used to get in the way of maximising their own line of services. It was at this point of their operations that they figured out how they can reallocate hours rostering into focusing more on their customers. We talked to one of their managers, Shamita Singh to see how eliminating blockers at work changed after using a time and attendance software. End-to-end servicing for practitioners On the daily, Shamita helps manage Hoxton. “We do everything — from setting up [the clients’] practice to typing, in-patient billing, bookkeeping, and virtual reception, which my team primarily does.” Digital administration, one of their core services, stemmed from the need of medical specialists who didn’t require their own full-time staff. This made Hoxton MPM’s service stand out in terms of value and efficiency, filling in the operational gaps for doctors who used to worry about such things. They not only personalise every practitioner’s booking system, they also cover database recording and after-hours correspondence. “Some staff are in the office and others are on-site with the clients,” says Ashley, one of their virtual receptionists. On top of everything they do, they also take care of the clinic they’re assigned to and manage their practitioner’s diary, sometimes answering up to 200 calls in a day. Among Hoxton’s core values are efficiency, certainty, and freedom. Allowing doctors to focus on their practice helps the integrity of their business. Shamita emphasised that the goal in properly running the platform is to help clients remain experts in their respective line of work and being the best at their craft. While people like Shamita are committed to focusing on clients save time and money by cutting down their documentation chores, Hoxton MPM’s own boatload of paperwork could be lessened too. Operating for 5 years now with approximately 30 staff members, they started taking on Tanda’s cloud-based digital platform to see how it can improve. On unique operational needs and manual rostering “We needed something that was both dynamic enough to work across our multi-team structure and that could also be online and easily accessible,” says Shamita. Having multiple offices and a number of remote staff who work from home was something that they considered when they chose Tanda. Hoxton MPM placed high importance on their offsite staff, and they wanted to ensure that a workforce management platform could cater to people who were both coming in everyday and those elsewhere.  “Another thing we were looking for is to make our timesheets easier, which we’ve done with Tanda’s clock-in and clock-out functions,” Shamita adds. It was also important that logging hours were not logistically limited, seeing that they have so many staff members spread in different locations. However, the fit of software for their employees wasn’t the only factor. “Before Tanda, the difficulties were mainly around timesheets, rostering, and applying for leave. Everything was completed manually and it was done in a document.” Rosters were also done in a spreadsheet, where they added dates and hours. It took several steps for a manager to have people on their shifts. Read more: 3 Common Rostering Problems Manager Face (And How to Solve Them) For example, if somebody filed for time off, they had to go back and forth the company’s annual leave registry before approving the leave request. This process applied when it came to rostering people, too. They then had to email the roster to the team every time an update is made, which would be often due to doctors’ fluctuating clinic hours. It was also quite taxing for them to track sick days, early shifts, and overtime hours. It took Shamita and her team several hours a week to get these tasks sorted — from creating spreadsheets to double-checking everything, down to sending them to staff and letting them know of any updates. The practice was far from sustainable. With last minute changes often happening, staff have to log back in and check the spreadsheet just to confirm who’s coming in at certain times of the day. “It was definitely hard to keep up with where we were going, especially that we’re changing the site,” Ashley mentions. Simplifying a complex process using software After using Tanda, a multi-step rostering process became a lot simpler. “It’s been a lot easier having Tanda, like having the live rosters for all members and being able to access them on the app,” Shamita says. For somebody who’s always at the forefront of operations, not having to manually log her hours on a spreadsheet made coming to work easier for Ashley. “It’s good to be able to have that accuracy on when we’re starting and finishing. Being able to get those live updates from the roster, [like] if there was a last minute change, you’d get a notification and you can always just log in and have a second look. I’ve also added the Tanda link to my calendar so the roster automatically goes into my calendar, so I know where I am in that order. Updates itself as well,” she concluded. No longer did she have to fuss over updates on documents and look at them every now and then; Tanda has been able to streamline the way they receive shift details directly from their managers. In addition, it provided peace of mind for people in Shamita’s position. The new technology made it simple for everyone, specifically by having a time clock that everyone could use. “People just seem to remember what time they worked by having the clock-in and clock-out function. People will have the app and they can just log in and see when they’re working. It’s been quite easy for [them] to pick up.” For Hoxton MPM, rostering doesn’t take hours anymore. While their clients’ hours still vary from time to time, having a platform where they can just apply pre-built schedules significantly reduced what used to take them several hours a week. “For me, in particular the template rostering [is] the feature that I use the most. Doctors usually have a regular schedule, so just having a template that I can match up to the week that they’re in [is useful] to roster my staff.” Shamita also mentioned that it’s been really critical for them to use said templates in rostering because they need to ensure that doctors have receptionists working with them in every shift, leaving no phone call unanswered. “Tanda allows us to see exactly what needs to be covered and if it is on us.” Hoxton MPM streamlined their rostering and time tracking across multiple staff and locations. With Tanda cutting hours of manual scheduling for their managers, it’s helped the business stay even more dedicated to their mission of reducing their clientele’s manual administrative work. To see how we can help your business simplify complex workforce management tasks, try Tanda for free today.

Spreadsheets to software: How Hoxton MPM focused more on clientele by rostering less

20 February 2020

Industry Insights Industry Insights    |   

Hospitality consistently receives the highest Fair Work Ombudsman disputes per year. In the 2018-2019 financial year, 36% of all anonymous reports were made in the industry. Data underscore troubles as well, with the fast food, restaurants, and cafe sectors leading the way in noncompliance rates. One report of a surprise audit conducted in 2018 netted $471,904 unpaid wages from businesses in Melbourne, Sydney, and Brisbane. Compliance issues harm business. There’s the spectre of litigation, as well as the direct blows to brand value. For the workforce, it’s disheartening to learn you may have been ill-compensated for your hours. One survey by hospitality job platform Barcats found of participating hospitality professionals, 40% suspected pay shortages in packets, with 33% of that number discovering suspicions were true.  How non-compliance hits business growth In our study conducted in partnership with Workforce, we found two of the most prominent concerns organisations have about compliance is damage to employee morale (mentioned by 58.1% of respondents) and damage to brand equity (44.2%).  Morale is key to engagement. According to Gallup’s State of the Global Workplace study, engaged employees consistently produce better business outcomes: 10% higher customer ratings, 20% higher sales, and 21% higher profitability. Research also says that highly engaged business units reported a 24% lower turnover in high-turnover organisations. And the hospitality industry has a problem with turnover. High competition, low barriers to entry for businesses and workers alike, and casual employment, all contribute to turnover.  Replacement hiring has costs. In one case study on Australian four and five-star hotels, researchers from Griffith University found $9,591 was the average cost for replacing an operational employee. At the same time, $109,909 per annum per establishment was the average cost for replacing executive, managerial and supervisory staff.  It doesn’t stop at that. The Fair Work Ombudsman imposes a strict set of penalties on those who fail to adhere to workplace laws, each misstep potentially costing businesses thousands to millions of dollars if they aren’t careful. Sanctions include: On-the-spot fines  Court appearances Money paid per infringement, amounts varying by severity Paying back employee entitlements plus interest Mandatory training and audits Compensation payments Some cases can go back decades. One such high-profile case is that of George Calombaris’ (of MasterChef Australia fame) MAdE Establishment group. In 2017, the group paid $2.6 million to 162 affected workers from three Melbourne restaurants. Two years later, that figure grew: In 2019 the company revealed they paid $7.8 million in wages to more than 500 employees. They attributed the errors to lapses in annualised salary arrangements, resulting in mistakes in overtime and penalty rates.  Watch: ASBFEO Ombudsman Kate Carnell on Governance and Compliance There’s even talk of the government drafting laws to criminalise intentional wage theft. Groups believe such rulings merits greater consequences, but it remains to be seen whether harsher penalties make it into law. Why labour violations happen With these risks, why do most businesses only learn of errors through employee complaints? The root is the same barrier preventing hospitality businesses from addressing compliance inaccuracies immediately: the complexity of Australian labour regulations. Wages are influenced by everything. Fair Work also makes periodic amendments to industry award rules, necessitating thorough reviews of changes lest an employer be liable for violations.  A payroll officer needs to take all that into account for calculations. That requires accurate timesheet and attendance records and onboarding documents, including employee information such as birthdays and qualifications. Human resource professionals have their hands full with workforce management, not just with running the daily operations, but also recruitment and onboarding processes to mitigate turnover.  Less breathing room means payroll officers may not catch errors on time—according to our Workforce Management Trends study, 46.1% of HR professionals say manual errors are a challenge they regularly face with time and attendance.  How successful businesses navigate complex regulatory changes Technology helps. Hundreds of workforce software solutions exist in the market aiming to solve payment problems their way. What makes for good software? Seek solutions considering compliance central to their system. Such systems should have an award interpretation engine that: Automatically updates base rates according to age and Fair Work standards Applies prepared allowances directly into staff wage calculations Calculates higher duty rates Provides detailed timesheet breakdowns that summarise all applicable modifiers to an employee’s wage for easy double-checking  Investing in automated solutions cuts down time alongside accurate employee clock-ins. That simplifies the double-checking process and can export directly to payroll as well.  Hospitality leaders can make data-driven decisions when it comes to staffing, which streamlines operations and minimises human error. That puts the future of your workforce firmly in your control: as technology develops, so can the scale of your operations.  

Check, Please: The Difficulties of Staying Compliant in Australian Hospitality

19 February 2020

Awards & Rostering    |   

Millions are being poured into locations around Australia as hospitality and tourism infrastructure projects aim to create thousands of new jobs and improve each city’s economy. But expensive new buildings may not be enough to attract local talent. According to projections from the annual National Skills Week in 2017, waiters, chefs, bar attendants and baristas, cafe and restaurant managers, and event organisers are all in high demand in the industry.  So how can we combat this, get more talent interested in hospitality, and improve retention? One way is for human resources leaders to turn to technology. Employers need to preserve a sense of connectivity between individuals while avoiding fostering an environment that encourages them always to be “on.”  Technology for a new workforce Why does good use of technology, especially a roster system, matter in hospitality?  It’s well-known that youth populate the industry. Many young people enter the workforce part-time while studying, with hospitality being their most likely choice. However, less and less young people are opting to stay afterwards. In this case, going digital matters—Generation Z’s entrance into the workforce has shown they’re vastly different from millennials, caring even more about technology, diversity, and money.  This is good: Gen Z employees can help solve age-old problems with a new perspective and can push businesses to innovate further. But to hold and keep their attention, you need digital tools. Hospitality businesses need to prove they not only invest in the people they recruit but also in the technology they use. Benefits of a hospitality roster system  HR technology solutions employed in many companies, unfortunately, don’t centre around the employee experience, but rather management’s. According to SAP researcher Gabby Burlacu, “Their job is not to complete a goal plan or fill out a self-evaluation of their performance, engage in learning and development courses, complete an engagement survey or any of the other HR-type tasks employees are frequently asked to do. But to many employees, it probably feels like HR thinks that is their job.” On an HR professional’s end, it could look like everything they need, organised in one convenient place. On an employee’s end, it could just be a mess. What people need out of a roster system now isn’t purely business process automation. Technology now needs to substantially improve the employee experience in a people-centric, flexible, and holistic manner, according to Burlacu. If a workforce platform provides this, benefits follow. Attendance Frequent tardiness, although initially small, can add up. In the frontline and shift worker heavy hospitality industry, tardiness can mean not just a wrench in the day’s roster, but loss of profit as well. Even the shortest tardy times can accumulate and impact the bottom line. Using a roster system that accurately tracks time and attendance can identify who these individuals are so that you can address their pain points immediately. Systems also protect your business from time theft with the bonus of saving processing time. Read more: Should you approve shift swaps at work? Productivity According to HR Technology News, a new Forrester study revealed that tech expenses have increased, but productivity gains usually associated with adopting tech have flatlined. While there’s no doubt proper utilisation of HR technology results in better productivity, instead of just using potential productivity to decide on a technology solution to use, look at overall business effectiveness instead. Software that can facilitate better communication among managers and employees, for example, isn’t necessarily a productivity solution but contributes significantly to improving the work environment.  Work-Life Balance A proper rostering software has the potential to improve employees’ work-life balance if it allows them more flexibility with their schedule. Plus, if it has the capability, seeing their potential benefits, leaves, and wages in one place gives them an accurate perspective of wages, enabling them to budget more. A roster system that allows for requests for shift swapping and unavailability markers (especially for those studying or attending to other responsibilities regularly) ensures employers don’t overstep.  Read more: 3 Ways Online Rostering Software Helps Businesses These are just a few of the benefits technology can provide for the hospitality industry. However, in such a customer-centric industry, HR professionals and hospitality leaders must not overlook how technology should augment and aid the human value of their workforce, and not replace it. Rote, repetitive, and inefficient manual tasks may be streamlined, but ultimately providing the best customer experience through human interaction is what the industry is all about. Making this easier for your employees to achieve will make overall business easier, too.    Tanda’s rostering system integrates seamlessly with other features to streamline workforce management and free up time for core business tasks. Give it a try today. No credit card required.

A Roster System’s Role in Revitalising Australian Hospitality

24 February 2020

Clients & Partners AU    |   

“We help busy doctors manage thriving practices.” When you visit Hoxton Medical Practice Management (MPM)’s website, that’s the first slogan you’ll see. A company focused on relieving pressures off of practitioners’ minds, this company based in Hampton East, VIC, Australia offers expertise ranging from virtual reception services down to medical billing support. But with several facilities on-hand means hiring people with different skills who work varying hours. While Hoxton MPM is completely dedicated in providing their clients 100% peace of mind, manual administrative work used to get in the way of maximising their own line of services. It was at this point of their operations that they figured out how they can reallocate hours rostering into focusing more on their customers. We talked to one of their managers, Shamita Singh to see how eliminating blockers at work changed after using a time and attendance software. End-to-end servicing for practitioners On the daily, Shamita helps manage Hoxton. “We do everything — from setting up [the clients’] practice to typing, in-patient billing, bookkeeping, and virtual reception, which my team primarily does.” Digital administration, one of their core services, stemmed from the need of medical specialists who didn’t require their own full-time staff. This made Hoxton MPM’s service stand out in terms of value and efficiency, filling in the operational gaps for doctors who used to worry about such things. They not only personalise every practitioner’s booking system, they also cover database recording and after-hours correspondence. “Some staff are in the office and others are on-site with the clients,” says Ashley, one of their virtual receptionists. On top of everything they do, they also take care of the clinic they’re assigned to and manage their practitioner’s diary, sometimes answering up to 200 calls in a day. Among Hoxton’s core values are efficiency, certainty, and freedom. Allowing doctors to focus on their practice helps the integrity of their business. Shamita emphasised that the goal in properly running the platform is to help clients remain experts in their respective line of work and being the best at their craft. While people like Shamita are committed to focusing on clients save time and money by cutting down their documentation chores, Hoxton MPM’s own boatload of paperwork could be lessened too. Operating for 5 years now with approximately 30 staff members, they started taking on Tanda’s cloud-based digital platform to see how it can improve. On unique operational needs and manual rostering “We needed something that was both dynamic enough to work across our multi-team structure and that could also be online and easily accessible,” says Shamita. Having multiple offices and a number of remote staff who work from home was something that they considered when they chose Tanda. Hoxton MPM placed high importance on their offsite staff, and they wanted to ensure that a workforce management platform could cater to people who were both coming in everyday and those elsewhere.  “Another thing we were looking for is to make our timesheets easier, which we’ve done with Tanda’s clock-in and clock-out functions,” Shamita adds. It was also important that logging hours were not logistically limited, seeing that they have so many staff members spread in different locations. However, the fit of software for their employees wasn’t the only factor. “Before Tanda, the difficulties were mainly around timesheets, rostering, and applying for leave. Everything was completed manually and it was done in a document.” Rosters were also done in a spreadsheet, where they added dates and hours. It took several steps for a manager to have people on their shifts. Read more: 3 Common Rostering Problems Manager Face (And How to Solve Them) For example, if somebody filed for time off, they had to go back and forth the company’s annual leave registry before approving the leave request. This process applied when it came to rostering people, too. They then had to email the roster to the team every time an update is made, which would be often due to doctors’ fluctuating clinic hours. It was also quite taxing for them to track sick days, early shifts, and overtime hours. It took Shamita and her team several hours a week to get these tasks sorted — from creating spreadsheets to double-checking everything, down to sending them to staff and letting them know of any updates. The practice was far from sustainable. With last minute changes often happening, staff have to log back in and check the spreadsheet just to confirm who’s coming in at certain times of the day. “It was definitely hard to keep up with where we were going, especially that we’re changing the site,” Ashley mentions. Simplifying a complex process using software After using Tanda, a multi-step rostering process became a lot simpler. “It’s been a lot easier having Tanda, like having the live rosters for all members and being able to access them on the app,” Shamita says. For somebody who’s always at the forefront of operations, not having to manually log her hours on a spreadsheet made coming to work easier for Ashley. “It’s good to be able to have that accuracy on when we’re starting and finishing. Being able to get those live updates from the roster, [like] if there was a last minute change, you’d get a notification and you can always just log in and have a second look. I’ve also added the Tanda link to my calendar so the roster automatically goes into my calendar, so I know where I am in that order. Updates itself as well,” she concluded. No longer did she have to fuss over updates on documents and look at them every now and then; Tanda has been able to streamline the way they receive shift details directly from their managers. In addition, it provided peace of mind for people in Shamita’s position. The new technology made it simple for everyone, specifically by having a time clock that everyone could use. “People just seem to remember what time they worked by having the clock-in and clock-out function. People will have the app and they can just log in and see when they’re working. It’s been quite easy for [them] to pick up.” For Hoxton MPM, rostering doesn’t take hours anymore. While their clients’ hours still vary from time to time, having a platform where they can just apply pre-built schedules significantly reduced what used to take them several hours a week. “For me, in particular the template rostering [is] the feature that I use the most. Doctors usually have a regular schedule, so just having a template that I can match up to the week that they’re in [is useful] to roster my staff.” Shamita also mentioned that it’s been really critical for them to use said templates in rostering because they need to ensure that doctors have receptionists working with them in every shift, leaving no phone call unanswered. “Tanda allows us to see exactly what needs to be covered and if it is on us.” Hoxton MPM streamlined their rostering and time tracking across multiple staff and locations. With Tanda cutting hours of manual scheduling for their managers, it’s helped the business stay even more dedicated to their mission of reducing their clientele’s manual administrative work. To see how we can help your business simplify complex workforce management tasks, try Tanda for free today.

Spreadsheets to software: How Hoxton MPM focused more on clientele by rostering less

20 February 2020

Industry Insights Industry Insights    |   

Hospitality consistently receives the highest Fair Work Ombudsman disputes per year. In the 2018-2019 financial year, 36% of all anonymous reports were made in the industry. Data underscore troubles as well, with the fast food, restaurants, and cafe sectors leading the way in noncompliance rates. One report of a surprise audit conducted in 2018 netted $471,904 unpaid wages from businesses in Melbourne, Sydney, and Brisbane. Compliance issues harm business. There’s the spectre of litigation, as well as the direct blows to brand value. For the workforce, it’s disheartening to learn you may have been ill-compensated for your hours. One survey by hospitality job platform Barcats found of participating hospitality professionals, 40% suspected pay shortages in packets, with 33% of that number discovering suspicions were true.  How non-compliance hits business growth In our study conducted in partnership with Workforce, we found two of the most prominent concerns organisations have about compliance is damage to employee morale (mentioned by 58.1% of respondents) and damage to brand equity (44.2%).  Morale is key to engagement. According to Gallup’s State of the Global Workplace study, engaged employees consistently produce better business outcomes: 10% higher customer ratings, 20% higher sales, and 21% higher profitability. Research also says that highly engaged business units reported a 24% lower turnover in high-turnover organisations. And the hospitality industry has a problem with turnover. High competition, low barriers to entry for businesses and workers alike, and casual employment, all contribute to turnover.  Replacement hiring has costs. In one case study on Australian four and five-star hotels, researchers from Griffith University found $9,591 was the average cost for replacing an operational employee. At the same time, $109,909 per annum per establishment was the average cost for replacing executive, managerial and supervisory staff.  It doesn’t stop at that. The Fair Work Ombudsman imposes a strict set of penalties on those who fail to adhere to workplace laws, each misstep potentially costing businesses thousands to millions of dollars if they aren’t careful. Sanctions include: On-the-spot fines  Court appearances Money paid per infringement, amounts varying by severity Paying back employee entitlements plus interest Mandatory training and audits Compensation payments Some cases can go back decades. One such high-profile case is that of George Calombaris’ (of MasterChef Australia fame) MAdE Establishment group. In 2017, the group paid $2.6 million to 162 affected workers from three Melbourne restaurants. Two years later, that figure grew: In 2019 the company revealed they paid $7.8 million in wages to more than 500 employees. They attributed the errors to lapses in annualised salary arrangements, resulting in mistakes in overtime and penalty rates.  Watch: ASBFEO Ombudsman Kate Carnell on Governance and Compliance There’s even talk of the government drafting laws to criminalise intentional wage theft. Groups believe such rulings merits greater consequences, but it remains to be seen whether harsher penalties make it into law. Why labour violations happen With these risks, why do most businesses only learn of errors through employee complaints? The root is the same barrier preventing hospitality businesses from addressing compliance inaccuracies immediately: the complexity of Australian labour regulations. Wages are influenced by everything. Fair Work also makes periodic amendments to industry award rules, necessitating thorough reviews of changes lest an employer be liable for violations.  A payroll officer needs to take all that into account for calculations. That requires accurate timesheet and attendance records and onboarding documents, including employee information such as birthdays and qualifications. Human resource professionals have their hands full with workforce management, not just with running the daily operations, but also recruitment and onboarding processes to mitigate turnover.  Less breathing room means payroll officers may not catch errors on time—according to our Workforce Management Trends study, 46.1% of HR professionals say manual errors are a challenge they regularly face with time and attendance.  How successful businesses navigate complex regulatory changes Technology helps. Hundreds of workforce software solutions exist in the market aiming to solve payment problems their way. What makes for good software? Seek solutions considering compliance central to their system. Such systems should have an award interpretation engine that: Automatically updates base rates according to age and Fair Work standards Applies prepared allowances directly into staff wage calculations Calculates higher duty rates Provides detailed timesheet breakdowns that summarise all applicable modifiers to an employee’s wage for easy double-checking  Investing in automated solutions cuts down time alongside accurate employee clock-ins. That simplifies the double-checking process and can export directly to payroll as well.  Hospitality leaders can make data-driven decisions when it comes to staffing, which streamlines operations and minimises human error. That puts the future of your workforce firmly in your control: as technology develops, so can the scale of your operations.  

Check, Please: The Difficulties of Staying Compliant in Australian Hospitality

19 February 2020

Most Popular

Awards & Rostering

What you need to know about the Casual Conversion Clause

On 1 October 2018, the Fair Work Commission announced that a new casual conversion clause will be included in 80+ modern awards across Australia. What does it mean? Casual conversion is a right given to regular casual staff to request for full-time or part-time employment status, given certain prerequisites. In the awards, a ‘regular casual employee’ is: “A casual employee who has, in the preceding period of 12 months, worked a pattern of hours on an ongoing basis which, without significant adjustment, the employee could continue to perform as a full-time employee or part-time employee under the provisions of this award.” Businesses whose awards fall under mandate are required to advise their casual employees of this clause. This does not require employers to offer conversion to their eligible employees; rather, the clause entitles all eligible employees the right to request for conversion. Who can apply? The clause allows casual workers to apply for conversion if: They have  been working for the business for twelve (12) months; and Their work pattern is an ongoing number of hours over the past year, which can be continued without adjustment upon conversion to full-time or part-time. Employers must provide casual employees with a copy of the casual conversion clause within their first year of initial engagement with the business. Casual employees who are eligible to apply should request their employers in writing. Can applications be rejected? Yes, applications can be rejected. Reasonable grounds include: A significant adjustment of work hours for the employee in order to accommodate their full-time or part-time employment status; The employee worked for short periods and/or irregular shifts or hours; and The position of the casual employee will cease to exist in the foreseeable future. Rejection of applications can be done, given that both employee and employer have discussed the decision. Should employers not convert a casual employee, a written refusal must be provided, indicating the reasonable grounds of rejection. Read more: What is the Contingent Workforce and how can you leverage it in your business? What awards are covered? The introduction of the clause covers 80+ modern awards, including: Hospitality Industry (General) Award 2010; Food, Beverage and Tobacco Manufacturing Award 2010; Manufacturing and Associated Industries and Occupations Award 2010; Building & Construction General On-site Award 2010; Concrete Products Award 2010; Electrical, Electronic & Communications Contracting Award 2010; Graphic Arts, Printing and Publishing Award 2010; Plumbing and Fire Sprinklers Award 2010; Textile, Clothing, Footwear and Associated Industries Award 2010; and Vehicle Manufacturing, Repair, Services and Retail Award 2010 To check if your business is included, click here. What should your business do next? It’s important to keep in mind that Fair Work’s decision does not require businesses to convert casual employees in all cases where a casual employee makes a request for conversion to their employer.  For this reason, it’s important to understand the criteria for casual conversion and understand what your obligations are when employees meet these requirements. If you or your business falls under the new clause, here are the steps you can take to stay compliant: Check your modern award or enterprise agreement. Awards with existing clauses for casual conversion may have different requirements. Check your award for the exact rules in your industry. Create a casual conversion letter. You can also download a copy here. Notify your employees. Make sure you give your casual staff (employed as of 1 October 2018) a copy of the final letter. Record the outcome of the casual conversion offer. Whether they accept or reject the offer, keep copies of their written responses for future reference. If you are unsure how the casual conversion clause affects your business, call the Fair Work Infoline on 13 13 94 or visit www.fairwork.gov.au To make sure you stay updated with the latest news on awards, employment, and compliance, subscribe to our newsletter today.

Product Updates

Domino’s and Tanda: Building the Workforces of the Future

Brisbane-based company Tanda has today announced a business partnership with Domino’s Pizza Enterprises Limited, to automate and optimise the company’s payroll process. The partnership will assist Domino’s in empowering its franchisees with the right technology and tools to efficiently manage rostering and payroll as a competitive edge. Tanda Director Tasmin Trezise said he is excited about the partnership. “Tanda is proud to be working collaboratively with Domino’s to build the future of workforce management, and this represents an exciting step towards using technology to shape enterprise workplaces,” said Mr Trezise. “Domino’s is an agile and forward-thinking company who are leading the way in terms of innovation, whether this is through their drone delivery services or re-imagining their labour supply chain management.” The partnership between the two companies will see a roll out of Tanda\'s software to over 700 stores across Australia and New Zealand. Domino’s Australia and New Zealand CEO Nick Knight said the Company was looking forward to making franchisee’s lives easier with the efficient time and attendance program. “We are always looking to use the latest innovative technology in everything that we do as a Company – this from delivery to customers and for systems and processes with franchisees,” said Mr Knight. “Rolling out Tanda in stores across Australia and New Zealand will allow our franchisees to efficiently roster and record team member’s attendance so we look forward to reaping the benefits of the innovative program.” Trezise explained that Domino’s franchisees would soon see incredible benefits after the working relationship with Tanda begins. “This partnership will empower Domino’s franchisees with a greater understanding and insight into their labour costs so they are able to make smarter and more informed business decisions whilst having comfort that their payroll complies with current awards and enterprise agreements. “The fact that Domino’s and other Australian businesses are using new technology like Tanda is a testament to Australia’s growing success as an innovative nation.” Domino’s partnership with Tanda began in the Company’s dedicated innovation space, the DLAB, which was designed to encourage out of the box thinking. From local corner cafes to global workforces, Tanda is revolutionising the world of rostering and payroll one shift at a time. About Tanda Tanda is a scalable workforce management SaaS, that is helping businesses to unlock efficiency and productivity gains through more effective labour force management. For more information, visit www.tanda.co About Domino’s Domino’s Pizza Enterprises Limited is the master franchisor for the Domino’s brand in Australia, New Zealand, Belgium, France, The Netherlands, Japan and Germany. Across these seven markets, DPE and its franchisees operate over 2,000 stores. For more information, please visit www.dominos.com.au For further information, media enquiries or images contact: Bridget Mahon Marketing Communications Officer Email: bridget@tanda.co

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Industry Insights    |   

How this retailer increased profit by $8.9m from rostering more hours

There has been a lot of speculation on why we are losing retailers so fast. An interesting research piece from the US presented an alternative hypothesis that generalises the issue down to rostering for profit rather than rostering to control costs. For context – If you were given the choice of increasing revenue by 5% or reducing costs by 5% in order to create the most profitable outcome, what would choose? A “back of the hand” calculation would show that reducing costs increases profit more than the equivalent uptick in revenue. Accordingly, most retailers choose option two. This makes sense if you assume the two scenarios are independent of each other, but what if the cost was your employees? This is where the problems arise. For industries like retail, where staff have a direct impact on sales, it’s not as simple of a question as cutting costs to increase profit. In a study led by Professor Marshall Fisher from Wharton, he and his research team constructed a conceptual model from historical data to identify stores within a US-based retail chain that had the highest potential to benefit from increased labour spend. Importantly, the strategy was actually implemented at 168 retail sites over a 26-week period to validate the model, with the retailer electing to implement the strategy further. The result: A near $8.9 million increase in profit of the stores included. The labour cost challenge The challenge in allocating labour budgets lies in the tradeoff between the known immediate payroll cost and the less certain increase in sales that could be achieved with more staff on hand. The researchers point out that retail managers have a tendency to overweigh the decision to reduce the known payroll cost than the less certain increase in sales which could be achieved by allocating additional labour spend. The labour budget death spiral The study highlights the limitation of the most common retail strategy — setting labour budgets as a portion of sales. Fisher points out that this approach creates a circular problem by failing to take into account how store labour spend can positively impact sales, with the worst case leading to a spiraling effect of reduced sales forecasts reducing labour spend which reduces sales further and so on. Quantifying the impact of labour spend on revenue Creating labour budgets that are designed to maximise profit requires retailers to know on a store-by-store basis the correlation between labour-spend and sales. One way to do this is by looking at times when staffing levels deviate from the original schedule. If ten staff were scheduled on a particular day, but on that day only eight turned up, did sales also decrease by the same portion? If not, by how much? If the answer to the above is that sales didn’t decrease at all, the store is likely overstaffed. If there is a measurable impact, the inverse scenario is likely true and the store may be losing sales by being understaffed. This is the same approach used in the study, which found the relationship between random staffing deviations and impacts on sales was statistically significant. Results showed an increase in labour spend pointed to increased sales at varying degrees, depending on known store attributes. Implementing the strategy for profit The study identified stores in a US retail chain which had the highest market potential, making them good candidates for an increased labour spend. The market potential factored in attributes like average basket value and proximity to competitors, which would create scenarios that allow workers to have the highest impact on converting sales. In the study, 168 stores were selected this way, then allocated a 10% increased labour budget over a 26-week period, of which 75% of the increase was actually consumed in practice by the stores. The outcome was a 4.5% increase in revenue at the impacted stores and resulting in a near $8.9 million profit increase. Learning from the strategy The study shows empirically why the common practice of setting labour budgets as a fixed proportion of forecasted revenue is often self-defeating when applied in a retail setting. An opportunity exists to all retailers to leverage this same profit-centric model for defining labour budgets. The data required is available to all retailers however, it may just be a matter of leveraging that information with the right systems. An integrated forecasting strategy that integrates foot traffic, sales, and employee scheduling data is a practical opportunity afforded to retailers of any size to optimise their labour resource allocations. The interesting part is, Fisher’s research is readily available to all retailers who are looking to drift away from the traditional method of fixing labour budget rosters. The next step is to get this method of labour resource allocation battle-tested in the Australian markets. Stay tuned. Up next: What is the Contingent Workforce and how can you leverage it in your business?

Industry Insights

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Check, Please: The Difficulties of Staying Compliant in Australian Hospitality

Hospitality consistently receives the highest Fair Work Ombudsman disputes per year. In the 2018-2019 financial year, 36% of all anonymous reports were made in the industry. Data underscore troubles as well, with the fast food, restaurants, and cafe sectors leading the way in noncompliance rates. One report of a surprise audit conducted in 2018 netted […]

Ensuring a Seamless Adoption of New Technology Among Frontline Employees

Technology as a business necessity In 2017, nearly half of all Australian innovation-active businesses spent on new equipment or technology, making tech the most common innovation expenditure — and rightly so. Technology has become a necessity for businesses everywhere, and the most competitive companies are always looking to upgrade theirs to improve productivity. However, it’s important […]

Awards & Rostering

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A Roster System’s Role in Revitalising Australian Hospitality

Millions are being poured into locations around Australia as hospitality and tourism infrastructure projects aim to create thousands of new jobs and improve each city’s economy. But expensive new buildings may not be enough to attract local talent. According to projections from the annual National Skills Week in 2017, waiters, chefs, bar attendants and baristas, […]

Mountains into Molehills: Ways Businesses Reduce Admin

With business growth comes the increase in tasks in a manager’s plate. Critical thinking, staying abreast with the trends, making data-driven decisions, and empowering the workforce to ensure success become more important. But as a business grows, admin and paperwork tend to balloon too. So how do you grow your business but not your paper […]

Product Updates

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50+ new features to grow everything but your paperwork.

There is a pattern consistent in most industries. Companies that succeed are ones where frontline managers have influence in improving the execution of business strategy. Former Schering-Plough (now Merck & Co.) CEO Fred Hassan says frontline managers ‘represent an all-important feedback loop that allows the CEO to stay abreast of the latest developments in the business.’ […]

Employee Onboarding: Collecting staff details made paperless (updated for 2019)

Introducing Tanda’s New Employee Onboarding feature! Tanda’s Employee Onboarding Feature is the paperless way to collect all those necessary staff details such as Tax file Numbers and Super Choice forms, without the hassle of scanning and signing forms, or chasing new staff for paperwork. Through Tanda, managers will now be able to onboard new staff […]

Events & Media

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How to Communicate as a Leader with William Gooderson

“Staff members have good and bad days. We need to adjust. There will be times when there is a short deadline. We need to drive and lead because we are the team leader. There will be times when you’ve got the flexibility to take staff on a journey,” says leadership expert William Gooderson of PwC. […]

Forging the Workforce of the Future: Can you increase employee attendance?

John is 5 minutes late for work every day while his colleague Martha is late for 30 minutes once a week. Do these late clock ins really matter? For many businesses, they do. In shift work industries and frontline roles, frequent tardiness can mean disruption and loss of profit. Even just 10 minutes of being […]

Clients & Partners

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Spreadsheets to software: How Hoxton MPM focused more on clientele by rostering less

“We help busy doctors manage thriving practices.” When you visit Hoxton Medical Practice Management (MPM)’s website, that’s the first slogan you’ll see. A company focused on relieving pressures off of practitioners’ minds, this company based in Hampton East, VIC, Australia offers expertise ranging from virtual reception services down to medical billing support. But with several […]

Everything’s coming up Roses Only: How Tanda helps retailers save 100+ hours a week

Valentine’s Day: On this day celebrating love and relationships, couples, friends, and family prepare their choice of gifts for the special people in their lives. Hearts adorn storefronts, packages and discounts abound, and behind the bustle and celebration are the retailers that make it all happen.  Today is one of the busiest days of the […]

Editor's Picks

Industry Insights    |   

How this retailer increased profit by $8.9m from rostering more hours

There has been a lot of speculation on why we are losing retailers so fast. An interesting research piece from the US presented an alternative hypothesis that generalises the issue down to rostering for profit rather than rostering to control costs. For context – If you were given the choice of increasing revenue by 5% or reducing costs by 5% in order to create the most profitable outcome, what would choose? A “back of the hand” calculation would show that reducing costs increases profit more than the equivalent uptick in revenue. Accordingly, most retailers choose option two. This makes sense if you assume the two scenarios are independent of each other, but what if the cost was your employees? This is where the problems arise. For industries like retail, where staff have a direct impact on sales, it’s not as simple of a question as cutting costs to increase profit. In a study led by Professor Marshall Fisher from Wharton, he and his research team constructed a conceptual model from historical data to identify stores within a US-based retail chain that had the highest potential to benefit from increased labour spend. Importantly, the strategy was actually implemented at 168 retail sites over a 26-week period to validate the model, with the retailer electing to implement the strategy further. The result: A near $8.9 million increase in profit of the stores included. The labour cost challenge The challenge in allocating labour budgets lies in the tradeoff between the known immediate payroll cost and the less certain increase in sales that could be achieved with more staff on hand. The researchers point out that retail managers have a tendency to overweigh the decision to reduce the known payroll cost than the less certain increase in sales which could be achieved by allocating additional labour spend. The labour budget death spiral The study highlights the limitation of the most common retail strategy — setting labour budgets as a portion of sales. Fisher points out that this approach creates a circular problem by failing to take into account how store labour spend can positively impact sales, with the worst case leading to a spiraling effect of reduced sales forecasts reducing labour spend which reduces sales further and so on. Quantifying the impact of labour spend on revenue Creating labour budgets that are designed to maximise profit requires retailers to know on a store-by-store basis the correlation between labour-spend and sales. One way to do this is by looking at times when staffing levels deviate from the original schedule. If ten staff were scheduled on a particular day, but on that day only eight turned up, did sales also decrease by the same portion? If not, by how much? If the answer to the above is that sales didn’t decrease at all, the store is likely overstaffed. If there is a measurable impact, the inverse scenario is likely true and the store may be losing sales by being understaffed. This is the same approach used in the study, which found the relationship between random staffing deviations and impacts on sales was statistically significant. Results showed an increase in labour spend pointed to increased sales at varying degrees, depending on known store attributes. Implementing the strategy for profit The study identified stores in a US retail chain which had the highest market potential, making them good candidates for an increased labour spend. The market potential factored in attributes like average basket value and proximity to competitors, which would create scenarios that allow workers to have the highest impact on converting sales. In the study, 168 stores were selected this way, then allocated a 10% increased labour budget over a 26-week period, of which 75% of the increase was actually consumed in practice by the stores. The outcome was a 4.5% increase in revenue at the impacted stores and resulting in a near $8.9 million profit increase. Learning from the strategy The study shows empirically why the common practice of setting labour budgets as a fixed proportion of forecasted revenue is often self-defeating when applied in a retail setting. An opportunity exists to all retailers to leverage this same profit-centric model for defining labour budgets. The data required is available to all retailers however, it may just be a matter of leveraging that information with the right systems. An integrated forecasting strategy that integrates foot traffic, sales, and employee scheduling data is a practical opportunity afforded to retailers of any size to optimise their labour resource allocations. The interesting part is, Fisher’s research is readily available to all retailers who are looking to drift away from the traditional method of fixing labour budget rosters. The next step is to get this method of labour resource allocation battle-tested in the Australian markets. Stay tuned. Up next: What is the Contingent Workforce and how can you leverage it in your business?

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