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Industry Insights UK    |   

Your restaurant interior design shouldn’t be an afterthought, and should be designed in a way that will drive more profit to your business. But how? To help you get started, here are four helpful tips to remember when designing and constructing your next restaurant. Size Matters Constructing your next restaurant starts with looking at the bare space you are going to lease or purchase. Size is everything, and you should remember to always measure twice and cut once. Total Food Service wrote an extensive guide on how to create your restaurant’s floor plan. According to them, the rule-of-thumb is that your dining space should occupy 60% of the total area, with the remaining 40% for other spaces (kitchen, prep, storage, etc.) To add to the dining space, they also provided general guidelines on how much square footage a restaurant should allocate per customer. For them, it varies based on the type of restaurant you are running: Fine Dining: 18 to 20 sq. ft. Full-Service Dining: 12 to 15 sq. ft. Counter Service: 18 to 20 sq. ft. Fast Food: 11 to 14 sq. ft. Table Service at a Hotel or Club:  15 to 18 sq. ft. ‏Banquet: 10 to 11 sq. ft. They also recommend that you should leave a minimum of 4 to 5 ft. per table to allow free movement of servers between stations. According to Tom Strother, co-founder and creative director of interior design firm Fabled Studio, ensuring that the operational layout works seamlessly and effortlessly for the waitstaff is essential in making sure that the guests have an excellent dining experience. Take this into account when preparing your restaurant interior design. Your Cuisine Determines Your Design For Strother, the first crucial thing they consider when working on a restaurant interior design is the concept and story of the restaurant, making sure that it is translated well into  the details of the design. It’s a no-brainer that your restaurant’s layout and aesthetic should reflect the type of service and cuisine you’re going to provide. The perfect restaurant design and layout is a marriage of form and function. Not only that - in the age of social media, the perfect restaurant interior design should be Instagrammable. As part of Paula Atwell’s guide on Chron, she dished out some tips on how to lay out your restaurant based on your concept and style of service: Cafeteria-style restaurants should have a circular pattern design in order to seamlessly move customers from the entrance to the service area, down to the cashier, and to their seats. Restaurants that offer tableside cooking should allocate space for supplies and a cooking surface. Take-out-heavy restaurants should layout a clear pathway from the doorway to the counter. Start (and Finish) With a Good Impression Your restaurant’s entrance is the first and last thing your customer sees. It goes without saying that it has to be downright perfect. The balance published an extensive blog entry on how to plan your restaurant’s outdoor space. Here are some key takeaways: Invest in a professionally-made sign. Likewise, make sure that other signages (parking signs, no smoking warnings, wifi information, etc.) should be professionally done as well. Don’t settle for a monochrome print out from your laser printer. Everything has to be on brand. Provide adequate lighting that both illuminates signages at night and provides a good ambience for customers. Erect menu boards outside your establishment to give customers and passers-by a good idea of what you can offer. Complement it with a separate sandwich board that lists down the specials. If possible, provide well-appointed outdoor seating as a waiting area for customers in queue. When the weather permits, expand that area to allow customers to dine al fresco. If You Can’t Stand the Heat, You Can’t Make a Good Kitchen The heart of every restaurant is the kitchen. This is where the magic happens — where raw ingredients transform into stunning dishes for your customers. That is why it is wise for you to invest most of your time and resources to constructing your restaurant’s kitchen. There are million-and-one factors to look after to construct your kitchen. POS Sector’s blog has a definitive article on the topic. Some of the best tips they gave are: Involve your kitchen staff — the ones who will use the facility on a daily basis — in the design and planning process. Your dishwasher might have insights and perspectives that a regular plumber cannot provide. Your kitchen should be ergonomic, energy efficient, well-ventilated, and (most of all) compliant with all health and safety regulations. Don’t scrimp on kitchen equipment. Procure tools that are professional-grade. Make sure that the layout is flexible, able to easily adjust itself for the future. Define working zones: food cleaning, cutting, baking, frying, etc. This streamlines the entire process and avoids unnecessary chaos, especially at peak hours. Store tools and appliances that serve similar functions together. Your restaurant interior design definitely plays a role in your business’ profitability. Make sure that it embodies your concept and story enough to attract customers. It should also have an operational layout that works seamlessly for your waitstaff. Finally, it should enrich your guests’ dining experience. Pair that up with great food and excellent service, and you’ll see your customers coming back to your restaurant over and over again.

4 Helpful Tips for Your Restaurant Interior Design This 2018

1 August 2018

Industry Insights UK    |   

Your restaurant interior design shouldn’t be an afterthought, and should be designed in a way that will drive more profit to your business. But how? To help you get started, here are four helpful tips to remember when designing and constructing your next restaurant. Size Matters Constructing your next restaurant starts with looking at the bare space you are going to lease or purchase. Size is everything, and you should remember to always measure twice and cut once. Total Food Service wrote an extensive guide on how to create your restaurant’s floor plan. According to them, the rule-of-thumb is that your dining space should occupy 60% of the total area, with the remaining 40% for other spaces (kitchen, prep, storage, etc.) To add to the dining space, they also provided general guidelines on how much square footage a restaurant should allocate per customer. For them, it varies based on the type of restaurant you are running: Fine Dining: 18 to 20 sq. ft. Full-Service Dining: 12 to 15 sq. ft. Counter Service: 18 to 20 sq. ft. Fast Food: 11 to 14 sq. ft. Table Service at a Hotel or Club:  15 to 18 sq. ft. ‏Banquet: 10 to 11 sq. ft. They also recommend that you should leave a minimum of 4 to 5 ft. per table to allow free movement of servers between stations. According to Tom Strother, co-founder and creative director of interior design firm Fabled Studio, ensuring that the operational layout works seamlessly and effortlessly for the waitstaff is essential in making sure that the guests have an excellent dining experience. Take this into account when preparing your restaurant interior design. Your Cuisine Determines Your Design For Strother, the first crucial thing they consider when working on a restaurant interior design is the concept and story of the restaurant, making sure that it is translated well into  the details of the design. It’s a no-brainer that your restaurant’s layout and aesthetic should reflect the type of service and cuisine you’re going to provide. The perfect restaurant design and layout is a marriage of form and function. Not only that - in the age of social media, the perfect restaurant interior design should be Instagrammable. As part of Paula Atwell’s guide on Chron, she dished out some tips on how to lay out your restaurant based on your concept and style of service: Cafeteria-style restaurants should have a circular pattern design in order to seamlessly move customers from the entrance to the service area, down to the cashier, and to their seats. Restaurants that offer tableside cooking should allocate space for supplies and a cooking surface. Take-out-heavy restaurants should layout a clear pathway from the doorway to the counter. Start (and Finish) With a Good Impression Your restaurant’s entrance is the first and last thing your customer sees. It goes without saying that it has to be downright perfect. The balance published an extensive blog entry on how to plan your restaurant’s outdoor space. Here are some key takeaways: Invest in a professionally-made sign. Likewise, make sure that other signages (parking signs, no smoking warnings, wifi information, etc.) should be professionally done as well. Don’t settle for a monochrome print out from your laser printer. Everything has to be on brand. Provide adequate lighting that both illuminates signages at night and provides a good ambience for customers. Erect menu boards outside your establishment to give customers and passers-by a good idea of what you can offer. Complement it with a separate sandwich board that lists down the specials. If possible, provide well-appointed outdoor seating as a waiting area for customers in queue. When the weather permits, expand that area to allow customers to dine al fresco. If You Can’t Stand the Heat, You Can’t Make a Good Kitchen The heart of every restaurant is the kitchen. This is where the magic happens — where raw ingredients transform into stunning dishes for your customers. That is why it is wise for you to invest most of your time and resources to constructing your restaurant’s kitchen. There are million-and-one factors to look after to construct your kitchen. POS Sector’s blog has a definitive article on the topic. Some of the best tips they gave are: Involve your kitchen staff — the ones who will use the facility on a daily basis — in the design and planning process. Your dishwasher might have insights and perspectives that a regular plumber cannot provide. Your kitchen should be ergonomic, energy efficient, well-ventilated, and (most of all) compliant with all health and safety regulations. Don’t scrimp on kitchen equipment. Procure tools that are professional-grade. Make sure that the layout is flexible, able to easily adjust itself for the future. Define working zones: food cleaning, cutting, baking, frying, etc. This streamlines the entire process and avoids unnecessary chaos, especially at peak hours. Store tools and appliances that serve similar functions together. Your restaurant interior design definitely plays a role in your business’ profitability. Make sure that it embodies your concept and story enough to attract customers. It should also have an operational layout that works seamlessly for your waitstaff. Finally, it should enrich your guests’ dining experience. Pair that up with great food and excellent service, and you’ll see your customers coming back to your restaurant over and over again.

4 Helpful Tips for Your Restaurant Interior Design This 2018

1 August 2018

Industry Insights UK    |   

Your restaurant interior design shouldn’t be an afterthought, and should be designed in a way that will drive more profit to your business. But how? To help you get started, here are four helpful tips to remember when designing and constructing your next restaurant. Size Matters Constructing your next restaurant starts with looking at the bare space you are going to lease or purchase. Size is everything, and you should remember to always measure twice and cut once. Total Food Service wrote an extensive guide on how to create your restaurant’s floor plan. According to them, the rule-of-thumb is that your dining space should occupy 60% of the total area, with the remaining 40% for other spaces (kitchen, prep, storage, etc.) To add to the dining space, they also provided general guidelines on how much square footage a restaurant should allocate per customer. For them, it varies based on the type of restaurant you are running: Fine Dining: 18 to 20 sq. ft. Full-Service Dining: 12 to 15 sq. ft. Counter Service: 18 to 20 sq. ft. Fast Food: 11 to 14 sq. ft. Table Service at a Hotel or Club:  15 to 18 sq. ft. ‏Banquet: 10 to 11 sq. ft. They also recommend that you should leave a minimum of 4 to 5 ft. per table to allow free movement of servers between stations. According to Tom Strother, co-founder and creative director of interior design firm Fabled Studio, ensuring that the operational layout works seamlessly and effortlessly for the waitstaff is essential in making sure that the guests have an excellent dining experience. Take this into account when preparing your restaurant interior design. Your Cuisine Determines Your Design For Strother, the first crucial thing they consider when working on a restaurant interior design is the concept and story of the restaurant, making sure that it is translated well into  the details of the design. It’s a no-brainer that your restaurant’s layout and aesthetic should reflect the type of service and cuisine you’re going to provide. The perfect restaurant design and layout is a marriage of form and function. Not only that - in the age of social media, the perfect restaurant interior design should be Instagrammable. As part of Paula Atwell’s guide on Chron, she dished out some tips on how to lay out your restaurant based on your concept and style of service: Cafeteria-style restaurants should have a circular pattern design in order to seamlessly move customers from the entrance to the service area, down to the cashier, and to their seats. Restaurants that offer tableside cooking should allocate space for supplies and a cooking surface. Take-out-heavy restaurants should layout a clear pathway from the doorway to the counter. Start (and Finish) With a Good Impression Your restaurant’s entrance is the first and last thing your customer sees. It goes without saying that it has to be downright perfect. The balance published an extensive blog entry on how to plan your restaurant’s outdoor space. Here are some key takeaways: Invest in a professionally-made sign. Likewise, make sure that other signages (parking signs, no smoking warnings, wifi information, etc.) should be professionally done as well. Don’t settle for a monochrome print out from your laser printer. Everything has to be on brand. Provide adequate lighting that both illuminates signages at night and provides a good ambience for customers. Erect menu boards outside your establishment to give customers and passers-by a good idea of what you can offer. Complement it with a separate sandwich board that lists down the specials. If possible, provide well-appointed outdoor seating as a waiting area for customers in queue. When the weather permits, expand that area to allow customers to dine al fresco. If You Can’t Stand the Heat, You Can’t Make a Good Kitchen The heart of every restaurant is the kitchen. This is where the magic happens — where raw ingredients transform into stunning dishes for your customers. That is why it is wise for you to invest most of your time and resources to constructing your restaurant’s kitchen. There are million-and-one factors to look after to construct your kitchen. POS Sector’s blog has a definitive article on the topic. Some of the best tips they gave are: Involve your kitchen staff — the ones who will use the facility on a daily basis — in the design and planning process. Your dishwasher might have insights and perspectives that a regular plumber cannot provide. Your kitchen should be ergonomic, energy efficient, well-ventilated, and (most of all) compliant with all health and safety regulations. Don’t scrimp on kitchen equipment. Procure tools that are professional-grade. Make sure that the layout is flexible, able to easily adjust itself for the future. Define working zones: food cleaning, cutting, baking, frying, etc. This streamlines the entire process and avoids unnecessary chaos, especially at peak hours. Store tools and appliances that serve similar functions together. Your restaurant interior design definitely plays a role in your business’ profitability. Make sure that it embodies your concept and story enough to attract customers. It should also have an operational layout that works seamlessly for your waitstaff. Finally, it should enrich your guests’ dining experience. Pair that up with great food and excellent service, and you’ll see your customers coming back to your restaurant over and over again.

4 Helpful Tips for Your Restaurant Interior Design This 2018

1 August 2018

Industry Insights UK    |   

Your restaurant interior design shouldn’t be an afterthought, and should be designed in a way that will drive more profit to your business. But how? To help you get started, here are four helpful tips to remember when designing and constructing your next restaurant. Size Matters Constructing your next restaurant starts with looking at the bare space you are going to lease or purchase. Size is everything, and you should remember to always measure twice and cut once. Total Food Service wrote an extensive guide on how to create your restaurant’s floor plan. According to them, the rule-of-thumb is that your dining space should occupy 60% of the total area, with the remaining 40% for other spaces (kitchen, prep, storage, etc.) To add to the dining space, they also provided general guidelines on how much square footage a restaurant should allocate per customer. For them, it varies based on the type of restaurant you are running: Fine Dining: 18 to 20 sq. ft. Full-Service Dining: 12 to 15 sq. ft. Counter Service: 18 to 20 sq. ft. Fast Food: 11 to 14 sq. ft. Table Service at a Hotel or Club:  15 to 18 sq. ft. ‏Banquet: 10 to 11 sq. ft. They also recommend that you should leave a minimum of 4 to 5 ft. per table to allow free movement of servers between stations. According to Tom Strother, co-founder and creative director of interior design firm Fabled Studio, ensuring that the operational layout works seamlessly and effortlessly for the waitstaff is essential in making sure that the guests have an excellent dining experience. Take this into account when preparing your restaurant interior design. Your Cuisine Determines Your Design For Strother, the first crucial thing they consider when working on a restaurant interior design is the concept and story of the restaurant, making sure that it is translated well into  the details of the design. It’s a no-brainer that your restaurant’s layout and aesthetic should reflect the type of service and cuisine you’re going to provide. The perfect restaurant design and layout is a marriage of form and function. Not only that - in the age of social media, the perfect restaurant interior design should be Instagrammable. As part of Paula Atwell’s guide on Chron, she dished out some tips on how to lay out your restaurant based on your concept and style of service: Cafeteria-style restaurants should have a circular pattern design in order to seamlessly move customers from the entrance to the service area, down to the cashier, and to their seats. Restaurants that offer tableside cooking should allocate space for supplies and a cooking surface. Take-out-heavy restaurants should layout a clear pathway from the doorway to the counter. Start (and Finish) With a Good Impression Your restaurant’s entrance is the first and last thing your customer sees. It goes without saying that it has to be downright perfect. The balance published an extensive blog entry on how to plan your restaurant’s outdoor space. Here are some key takeaways: Invest in a professionally-made sign. Likewise, make sure that other signages (parking signs, no smoking warnings, wifi information, etc.) should be professionally done as well. Don’t settle for a monochrome print out from your laser printer. Everything has to be on brand. Provide adequate lighting that both illuminates signages at night and provides a good ambience for customers. Erect menu boards outside your establishment to give customers and passers-by a good idea of what you can offer. Complement it with a separate sandwich board that lists down the specials. If possible, provide well-appointed outdoor seating as a waiting area for customers in queue. When the weather permits, expand that area to allow customers to dine al fresco. If You Can’t Stand the Heat, You Can’t Make a Good Kitchen The heart of every restaurant is the kitchen. This is where the magic happens — where raw ingredients transform into stunning dishes for your customers. That is why it is wise for you to invest most of your time and resources to constructing your restaurant’s kitchen. There are million-and-one factors to look after to construct your kitchen. POS Sector’s blog has a definitive article on the topic. Some of the best tips they gave are: Involve your kitchen staff — the ones who will use the facility on a daily basis — in the design and planning process. Your dishwasher might have insights and perspectives that a regular plumber cannot provide. Your kitchen should be ergonomic, energy efficient, well-ventilated, and (most of all) compliant with all health and safety regulations. Don’t scrimp on kitchen equipment. Procure tools that are professional-grade. Make sure that the layout is flexible, able to easily adjust itself for the future. Define working zones: food cleaning, cutting, baking, frying, etc. This streamlines the entire process and avoids unnecessary chaos, especially at peak hours. Store tools and appliances that serve similar functions together. Your restaurant interior design definitely plays a role in your business’ profitability. Make sure that it embodies your concept and story enough to attract customers. It should also have an operational layout that works seamlessly for your waitstaff. Finally, it should enrich your guests’ dining experience. Pair that up with great food and excellent service, and you’ll see your customers coming back to your restaurant over and over again.

4 Helpful Tips for Your Restaurant Interior Design This 2018

1 August 2018

Industry Insights UK    |   

Your restaurant interior design shouldn’t be an afterthought, and should be designed in a way that will drive more profit to your business. But how? To help you get started, here are four helpful tips to remember when designing and constructing your next restaurant. Size Matters Constructing your next restaurant starts with looking at the bare space you are going to lease or purchase. Size is everything, and you should remember to always measure twice and cut once. Total Food Service wrote an extensive guide on how to create your restaurant’s floor plan. According to them, the rule-of-thumb is that your dining space should occupy 60% of the total area, with the remaining 40% for other spaces (kitchen, prep, storage, etc.) To add to the dining space, they also provided general guidelines on how much square footage a restaurant should allocate per customer. For them, it varies based on the type of restaurant you are running: Fine Dining: 18 to 20 sq. ft. Full-Service Dining: 12 to 15 sq. ft. Counter Service: 18 to 20 sq. ft. Fast Food: 11 to 14 sq. ft. Table Service at a Hotel or Club:  15 to 18 sq. ft. ‏Banquet: 10 to 11 sq. ft. They also recommend that you should leave a minimum of 4 to 5 ft. per table to allow free movement of servers between stations. According to Tom Strother, co-founder and creative director of interior design firm Fabled Studio, ensuring that the operational layout works seamlessly and effortlessly for the waitstaff is essential in making sure that the guests have an excellent dining experience. Take this into account when preparing your restaurant interior design. Your Cuisine Determines Your Design For Strother, the first crucial thing they consider when working on a restaurant interior design is the concept and story of the restaurant, making sure that it is translated well into  the details of the design. It’s a no-brainer that your restaurant’s layout and aesthetic should reflect the type of service and cuisine you’re going to provide. The perfect restaurant design and layout is a marriage of form and function. Not only that - in the age of social media, the perfect restaurant interior design should be Instagrammable. As part of Paula Atwell’s guide on Chron, she dished out some tips on how to lay out your restaurant based on your concept and style of service: Cafeteria-style restaurants should have a circular pattern design in order to seamlessly move customers from the entrance to the service area, down to the cashier, and to their seats. Restaurants that offer tableside cooking should allocate space for supplies and a cooking surface. Take-out-heavy restaurants should layout a clear pathway from the doorway to the counter. Start (and Finish) With a Good Impression Your restaurant’s entrance is the first and last thing your customer sees. It goes without saying that it has to be downright perfect. The balance published an extensive blog entry on how to plan your restaurant’s outdoor space. Here are some key takeaways: Invest in a professionally-made sign. Likewise, make sure that other signages (parking signs, no smoking warnings, wifi information, etc.) should be professionally done as well. Don’t settle for a monochrome print out from your laser printer. Everything has to be on brand. Provide adequate lighting that both illuminates signages at night and provides a good ambience for customers. Erect menu boards outside your establishment to give customers and passers-by a good idea of what you can offer. Complement it with a separate sandwich board that lists down the specials. If possible, provide well-appointed outdoor seating as a waiting area for customers in queue. When the weather permits, expand that area to allow customers to dine al fresco. If You Can’t Stand the Heat, You Can’t Make a Good Kitchen The heart of every restaurant is the kitchen. This is where the magic happens — where raw ingredients transform into stunning dishes for your customers. That is why it is wise for you to invest most of your time and resources to constructing your restaurant’s kitchen. There are million-and-one factors to look after to construct your kitchen. POS Sector’s blog has a definitive article on the topic. Some of the best tips they gave are: Involve your kitchen staff — the ones who will use the facility on a daily basis — in the design and planning process. Your dishwasher might have insights and perspectives that a regular plumber cannot provide. Your kitchen should be ergonomic, energy efficient, well-ventilated, and (most of all) compliant with all health and safety regulations. Don’t scrimp on kitchen equipment. Procure tools that are professional-grade. Make sure that the layout is flexible, able to easily adjust itself for the future. Define working zones: food cleaning, cutting, baking, frying, etc. This streamlines the entire process and avoids unnecessary chaos, especially at peak hours. Store tools and appliances that serve similar functions together. Your restaurant interior design definitely plays a role in your business’ profitability. Make sure that it embodies your concept and story enough to attract customers. It should also have an operational layout that works seamlessly for your waitstaff. Finally, it should enrich your guests’ dining experience. Pair that up with great food and excellent service, and you’ll see your customers coming back to your restaurant over and over again.

4 Helpful Tips for Your Restaurant Interior Design This 2018

1 August 2018

Industry Insights UK    |   

Your restaurant interior design shouldn’t be an afterthought, and should be designed in a way that will drive more profit to your business. But how? To help you get started, here are four helpful tips to remember when designing and constructing your next restaurant. Size Matters Constructing your next restaurant starts with looking at the bare space you are going to lease or purchase. Size is everything, and you should remember to always measure twice and cut once. Total Food Service wrote an extensive guide on how to create your restaurant’s floor plan. According to them, the rule-of-thumb is that your dining space should occupy 60% of the total area, with the remaining 40% for other spaces (kitchen, prep, storage, etc.) To add to the dining space, they also provided general guidelines on how much square footage a restaurant should allocate per customer. For them, it varies based on the type of restaurant you are running: Fine Dining: 18 to 20 sq. ft. Full-Service Dining: 12 to 15 sq. ft. Counter Service: 18 to 20 sq. ft. Fast Food: 11 to 14 sq. ft. Table Service at a Hotel or Club:  15 to 18 sq. ft. ‏Banquet: 10 to 11 sq. ft. They also recommend that you should leave a minimum of 4 to 5 ft. per table to allow free movement of servers between stations. According to Tom Strother, co-founder and creative director of interior design firm Fabled Studio, ensuring that the operational layout works seamlessly and effortlessly for the waitstaff is essential in making sure that the guests have an excellent dining experience. Take this into account when preparing your restaurant interior design. Your Cuisine Determines Your Design For Strother, the first crucial thing they consider when working on a restaurant interior design is the concept and story of the restaurant, making sure that it is translated well into  the details of the design. It’s a no-brainer that your restaurant’s layout and aesthetic should reflect the type of service and cuisine you’re going to provide. The perfect restaurant design and layout is a marriage of form and function. Not only that - in the age of social media, the perfect restaurant interior design should be Instagrammable. As part of Paula Atwell’s guide on Chron, she dished out some tips on how to lay out your restaurant based on your concept and style of service: Cafeteria-style restaurants should have a circular pattern design in order to seamlessly move customers from the entrance to the service area, down to the cashier, and to their seats. Restaurants that offer tableside cooking should allocate space for supplies and a cooking surface. Take-out-heavy restaurants should layout a clear pathway from the doorway to the counter. Start (and Finish) With a Good Impression Your restaurant’s entrance is the first and last thing your customer sees. It goes without saying that it has to be downright perfect. The balance published an extensive blog entry on how to plan your restaurant’s outdoor space. Here are some key takeaways: Invest in a professionally-made sign. Likewise, make sure that other signages (parking signs, no smoking warnings, wifi information, etc.) should be professionally done as well. Don’t settle for a monochrome print out from your laser printer. Everything has to be on brand. Provide adequate lighting that both illuminates signages at night and provides a good ambience for customers. Erect menu boards outside your establishment to give customers and passers-by a good idea of what you can offer. Complement it with a separate sandwich board that lists down the specials. If possible, provide well-appointed outdoor seating as a waiting area for customers in queue. When the weather permits, expand that area to allow customers to dine al fresco. If You Can’t Stand the Heat, You Can’t Make a Good Kitchen The heart of every restaurant is the kitchen. This is where the magic happens — where raw ingredients transform into stunning dishes for your customers. That is why it is wise for you to invest most of your time and resources to constructing your restaurant’s kitchen. There are million-and-one factors to look after to construct your kitchen. POS Sector’s blog has a definitive article on the topic. Some of the best tips they gave are: Involve your kitchen staff — the ones who will use the facility on a daily basis — in the design and planning process. Your dishwasher might have insights and perspectives that a regular plumber cannot provide. Your kitchen should be ergonomic, energy efficient, well-ventilated, and (most of all) compliant with all health and safety regulations. Don’t scrimp on kitchen equipment. Procure tools that are professional-grade. Make sure that the layout is flexible, able to easily adjust itself for the future. Define working zones: food cleaning, cutting, baking, frying, etc. This streamlines the entire process and avoids unnecessary chaos, especially at peak hours. Store tools and appliances that serve similar functions together. Your restaurant interior design definitely plays a role in your business’ profitability. Make sure that it embodies your concept and story enough to attract customers. It should also have an operational layout that works seamlessly for your waitstaff. Finally, it should enrich your guests’ dining experience. Pair that up with great food and excellent service, and you’ll see your customers coming back to your restaurant over and over again.

4 Helpful Tips for Your Restaurant Interior Design This 2018

1 August 2018

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Why Fingerprint Scanners don’t work for Time & Attendance

The ability to quickly identify and verify individuals has been a crucial skill in human society, since the start of civilisation. Where previously face-to-face recognition would have sufficed in tribes and small villages, thanks to today’s rapidly growing global population we require more tools to quickly identify who someone is. In the workplace the need to identify individuals is particularly important, as it’s often tied to staff attendance, payroll, and workplace security. Throughout the years various solutions have been used to verify staff attendance from paper timesheets, to the Bundy Clock, to fingerprint and biometric scanners. Despite the best efforts of some die-hard fans, the fingerprint scanner has reached its limit, being surpassed by the electronic time clock. With so many other solutions available at our fingertips, why are some people so desperately clinging to their fingerprint scanner? Surely we’ve all seen enough spy movies to know fingerprint scanners aren’t foolproof, let alone feasible in today’s day and age where most of the fun comes from trying to fool the system. And yet, it’s something that we still occasionally hear, “why don’t you have fingerprint scanners?” So to put the debate to rest once and for all, here are three reasons why fingerprint scanners don’t work. And before you start saying, ‘but what about this…” here are three great reasons why the electronic time clock has surpassed the fingerprint scanner. 3 Reasons why fingerprint scanners don’t work to track staff attendance 1. They’re Expensive No matter which way you look at it, fingerprint scanners are expensive equipment. Despite the fact that the technology has been around for years, the cost of the device still remains relatively high, potentially setting you back a few thousand dollars. In addition to the device, the cost of the integration between the scanner and corresponding system can be expensive to build. The scanners are delicate, and aren’t always built to handle the hundreds of fingerprints pressed onto them throughout their lifetime. Which brings me to my next point... 2. They’re Unreliable Unlike your favourite FBI crime-show encryption-grade biometric scanners, workplace fingerprint scanners are notoriously unreliable. In order to correctly identify and record an individual, fingerprint scanners require a clear image or impression of your fingerprint. Fingers that are dirty, greasy, cold or wet for example, often don’t register on the scanner, making it hard to both clock out, and verify the individual. Employers who prefer to use fingerprint scanners, do so because they think it’s easier than remembering a passcode. However should the fingerprint scanner fail to register the scan, some systems will request a passcode. Not only is this an additional hassle to staff who are trying simply to clock in or out, but it also opens the window to time theft through buddy clocking. 3. Maintenance is a pain As previously mentioned, fingerprint scanners are not cheap. They’re a costly purchase, and are even more expensive to repair or replace when they wear out. Repairing a broken scanner requires a specialised technician, and often costly parts. On the occasion that it is easier to replace than repair, users often run into more problems as they are not readily available at your local JB Hi-Fi or electronics outlet. On top of this, users often experience issues around the device’s durability, which lead to additional maintenance costs and ultimately a new device down the track. Introducing the 21st Century solution Electronic time clocks are the most robust, user-friendly, and affordable solution to record staff attendance. According to the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB), 11.2 million Australians owned a tablet device in 2015. It’s therefore no surprise that table based time clocks like Tanda are taking off in popularity amongst Australia’s workforce, thanks to their ease of use, and reliability. By utilising a tablet device, they provide an effective and consistent solution to time theft as well as streamlining your entire payroll process. 3 Reasons why electronic time clocks are the market leading solution: 1. Affordability Tablets in their various forms have started to become more commonplace in businesses of all sizes. This is thanks to more core business functions such as POS, inventory, and payment processing, becoming available on tablet devices. This technology is providing business owners with greater mobility to engage with customers, as well as streamlining core business activities in one device. Time Clock tablets are easily accessible, affordable and present a number of additional benefits to a business looking to improve their customer offering. 2. Robust and reliable. Thanks to the prevalence of tablet usage, most people are familiar with how to use a tablet and how they should be treated. Tablets are touch-screen based and as such built to handle lots of little fingers pushing and tapping the screen. Tanda’s Time Clock verifies staff attendance through photos and PIN code verification. Which means that unlike a fingerprint scanner, it doesn’t matter if staff have dirty or wet fingers, they’ll still be able to clock out the first time around. The timestamp and photo verification also make it quick and easy for managers and business owners to quickly check that the right person has clocked in and out for the correct shift. 3. Cloud-based for more options Using a cloud-based Time Clock solution like Tanda provides users with more options, which enable rather than restrict the user. Software maintenance and upgrades are not required, as they’re done automatically in the system. Devices are easy to replace and interchangeable, and should the system connection be disrupted, all clock in data is stored locally and uploaded to the cloud later. In addition to this, as a backup, users can access the Time Clock app through a browser on a desktop. Using a cloud solution to track staff attendance provides unparalleled opportunities to streamline additional business administration tasks, as well as providing greater insight into labour costs, staff punctuality and staff engagement. Workplaces are busy places, and managers have much better things to spend their time on than trying to get the fingerprint scanner to work. Using electronic Time Clocks to track employee attendance allows staff to clock in quickly and efficiently, so that they can get out of the backroom and working in your business. Because at the end of the day, you need a system that is affordable, reliable, and accessible, so that you can get on with paying staff and focusing on your business.

Product Updates

New Tanda Time Clock

Today we\'re excited to announce the upcoming release of a newly redesigned Tanda Employee Time Clock. Addressing the problem of recording accurate employee Time and Attendance is core to ensuring we service you, our customers. This is why, on the 29th of January 2019, an update to both iOS and Android will be released on the respective app stores. Any update from the app stores from the 29th of January onwards will download this new Time Clock. The new Time Clock features a bunch of improvements that are expanded upon below: A new redesign Clock breaks with break buttons Portrait & Landscape Orientation Smart shift status Facial detection Easier device reporting To get this new Time Clock now - download the Beta on both Android and iOS. Redesign New colours, new design and some obvious layout changes have been perfected and refined for this new Time Clock. A zappy keypad now sits on a deep navy background that ripples blue waves to the rounded edge of each button. Successful entry opens a vibrant and compact user interface that pops with judicious colours. A thin-blue timer encapsulates the \'close\' button and indicates when the Time Clock screen times out - gleefully sliding all contents away. Employee\'s information is smartly displayed within the shift card and clocked times are swiftly populated upon each action. This is the Time Clock of the future. Get Beta versions now. Clock Breaks with Break Buttons The Time Clock will automatically show/hide break buttons based on the Settings enabled in your My Tanda account. If your My Tanda account doesn\'t allow staff to clock breaks - your Time Clock will display just \'Clock in\' and \'Clock out\' buttons automatically. Read more on Displaying Break Buttons or our blog post on the release of multi-breaks. See it in action below: Portrait & Landscape Orientation Dock your tablet in whatever orientation suits. The new Time Clock will dock and send photos in portrait, landscape and even upside-down (charging ports are sometimes in funky spots). All features will work as expected. Smart Shift Status Knowing what stage of a shift you\'re in helps Timesheet reporting and accuracy. That\'s why we\'ve made the Time Clock smarter in detecting a shift status (whether it\'s started, on a break, near completion) to automatically render the correct button action. This will go a long way in answering common questions staff have: what button should I press? was I on a break or already clocked in? how long was the break I just took? and providing instant clarity during a shift. Facial Detection Making sure the correct staff are at work at the correct time is important for your business. Equally important is making sure the correct staff are clocking in. As an introduction for much cooler things to come, both iOS and Android support facial detection on the Time Clock. Device Reporting We want our customers to successfully manage their business, not their Tanda accounts. That\'s why we\'ve made reporting device information about your Time Clock as simple and as fast as  possible to Tanda Support and technical staff to help us assist you debug any issues. Read more about how to Send Device Info to Tanda. The Wrap This new Time Clock will provide quicker clarity to employees throughout their shift and help support the entire shift cycle. Users on Android 5.0+ and iOS Devices 9.0+ can download the Beta version right now and get clocking in. The Time Clock will be released in full for everyone on January 29th 2019 - to prepare for this release. Ensure you have: Your 8 digit setup code or login details prepared All pending clock ins sent prior to updating Read the FAQ If you have any questions, please contact support@tanda.co.

Events & Media AU Industry Insights

Domino’s and Tanda: Building the Workforces of the Future

Brisbane-based company Tanda has today announced a business partnership with Domino’s Pizza Enterprises Limited, to automate and optimise the company’s payroll process. The partnership will assist Domino’s in empowering its franchisees with the right technology and tools to efficiently manage rostering and payroll as a competitive edge. Tanda Director Tasmin Trezise said he is excited about the partnership. “Tanda is proud to be working collaboratively with Domino’s to build the future of workforce management, and this represents an exciting step towards using technology to shape enterprise workplaces,” said Mr Trezise. “Domino’s is an agile and forward-thinking company who are leading the way in terms of innovation, whether this is through their drone delivery services or re-imagining their labour supply chain management.” The partnership between the two companies will see a roll out of Tanda\'s software to over 700 stores across Australia and New Zealand. Domino’s Australia and New Zealand CEO Nick Knight said the Company was looking forward to making franchisee’s lives easier with the efficient time and attendance program. “We are always looking to use the latest innovative technology in everything that we do as a Company – this from delivery to customers and for systems and processes with franchisees,” said Mr Knight. “Rolling out Tanda in stores across Australia and New Zealand will allow our franchisees to efficiently roster and record team member’s attendance so we look forward to reaping the benefits of the innovative program.” Trezise explained that Domino’s franchisees would soon see incredible benefits after the working relationship with Tanda begins. “This partnership will empower Domino’s franchisees with a greater understanding and insight into their labour costs so they are able to make smarter and more informed business decisions whilst having comfort that their payroll complies with current awards and enterprise agreements. “The fact that Domino’s and other Australian businesses are using new technology like Tanda is a testament to Australia’s growing success as an innovative nation.” Domino’s partnership with Tanda began in the Company’s dedicated innovation space, the DLAB, which was designed to encourage out of the box thinking. From local corner cafes to global workforces, Tanda is revolutionising the world of rostering and payroll one shift at a time. About Tanda Tanda is a scalable workforce management SaaS, that is helping businesses to unlock efficiency and productivity gains through more effective labour force management. For more information, visit www.tanda.co About Domino’s Domino’s Pizza Enterprises Limited is the master franchisor for the Domino’s brand in Australia, New Zealand, Belgium, France, The Netherlands, Japan and Germany. Across these seven markets, DPE and its franchisees operate over 2,000 stores. For more information, please visit www.dominos.com.au For further information, media enquiries or images contact: Bridget Mahon Marketing Communications Officer Email: bridget@tanda.co

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