The Print Bar uses MYOB and Tanda to control costs

Josh Cameron

6 March 2014    |   

The Print Bar’s warehouse in the inner-suburbs of Brisbane is a symphony of people and machinery, churning out some of the highest quality custom t-shirt printing available in Australia. In just 5 years, Managing Director Jared Fulinfaw has grown from 2 employees in his parents’ garage to become one of largest suppliers of custom t-shirt printing in Australia, with 28 employees working around the clock, 7 days a week. It’s a resounding success story, but it’s clearly been no accident. Jared is keenly focused on running a lean business and striding ahead of the competition. Tools for rapid growth To run The Print Bar, Jared is hands on with everything and believes that up-to-date and forward looking financial data is essential. He uses MYOB to manage his finances, and Tanda to manage his people. “MYOB lets me keep track of my inventory and expenses, I even have my accounts reconciled fortnightly so I know exactly where I am. Tanda is for managing my biggest asset and my biggest expense – my team. To sell my product at competitive prices and maintain my margins, I need to be great at managing, rostering, and keep a very close eye on the costs of my staff.” “My team is everything,” says Jared. And the team agree — they say he’s the best boss ever. Rostering Every week, Jared uses Tanda to put together his roster. He starts by copying the last week’s so he has a template to work with, then makes any changes necessary based on availability or feedback from his team during the week. Next, he checks the roster’s cost – based on the award rules he’s configured – to ensure that he’s within budget. When it’s all looking good, he sends the roster out to staff by email. He generally does this well before the working week; if he needs to make any urgent changes afterwards, an updated roster by SMS alerts the relevant people. Attendance The Print Bar staff clock in and out of work using a Tanda time clock. It’s positioned on the wall near the entrance to the staff room, so it’s easy to spot and hard to forget! For Jared, the time clock acts as a virtual assistant – every day he gets a roll call of who clocked in, and who didn’t (based on their roster). And if someone’s not at work on time on a weekend, he also gets an SMS alert so he can quickly run in if need be. Timesheets and Payroll Every few days, Jared checks over staff timesheets, makes any necessary changes, and approves shifts when he’s happy with them. At the end of the fortnightly pay cycle, he clicks a button to export the timesheets directly to MYOB. Because Jared’s configured Tanda to work with his EBA, all of the data he downloads is mapped to the correct MYOB wage category – saving him hours he’d have spent doing it by hand.

The Print Bar’s warehouse in the inner-suburbs of Brisbane is a symphony of people and machinery, churning out some of the highest quality custom t-shirt printing available in Australia.

In just 5 years, Managing Director Jared Fulinfaw has grown from 2 employees in his parents’ garage to become one of largest suppliers of custom t-shirt printing in Australia, with 28 employees working around the clock, 7 days a week. It’s a resounding success story, but it’s clearly been no accident. Jared is keenly focused on running a lean business and striding ahead of the competition.

Tools for rapid growth

To run The Print Bar, Jared is hands on with everything and believes that up-to-date and forward looking financial data is essential. He uses MYOB to manage his finances, and Tanda to manage his people.

“MYOB lets me keep track of my inventory and expenses, I even have my accounts reconciled fortnightly so I know exactly where I am. Tanda is for managing my biggest asset and my biggest expense – my team. To sell my product at competitive prices and maintain my margins, I need to be great at managing, rostering, and keep a very close eye on the costs of my staff.”

“My team is everything,” says Jared. And the team agree — they say he’s the best boss ever.

Rostering

Every week, Jared uses Tanda to put together his roster. He starts by copying the last week’s so he has a template to work with, then makes any changes necessary based on availability or feedback from his team during the week.

Next, he checks the roster’s cost – based on the award rules he’s configured – to ensure that he’s within budget. When it’s all looking good, he sends the roster out to staff by email. He generally does this well before the working week; if he needs to make any urgent changes afterwards, an updated roster by SMS alerts the relevant people.

Attendance

The Print Bar staff clock in and out of work using a Tanda time clock. It’s positioned on the wall near the entrance to the staff room, so it’s easy to spot and hard to forget!

For Jared, the time clock acts as a virtual assistant – every day he gets a roll call of who clocked in, and who didn’t (based on their roster). And if someone’s not at work on time on a weekend, he also gets an SMS alert so he can quickly run in if need be.

Timesheets and Payroll

Every few days, Jared checks over staff timesheets, makes any necessary changes, and approves shifts when he’s happy with them. At the end of the fortnightly pay cycle, he clicks a button to export the timesheets directly to MYOB.

Because Jared’s configured Tanda to work with his EBA, all of the data he downloads is mapped to the correct MYOB wage category – saving him hours he’d have spent doing it by hand.

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About the author

Josh Cameron

As our Chief Strategy Officer, Josh works across our product and customer teams in the US, Australia, and Asia.

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