Are your staff qualified to work?

Monic Del Rosario

17 October 2016    |   

Knowing when staff are working is one thing, but knowing that staff are qualified and competent can add a huge reassurance for employers. Industries such as hospitality, childcare and medical services are required to track staff qualifications to meet legal compliance regulations. In addition to recording staff qualifications, childcare centres are required to display staff qualifications on the roster. Why it’s important to keep a record of staff qualifications Qualification compliance arises as an issue for businesses, as some jobs legally require the specific qualification and knowledge to perform a certain task or responsibility. For example: Bartenders must obtain a Responsible Service of Alcohol certification (RSA) before being able to legally work behind a bar and serve alcohol to patrons. If they also work in food production, then they may be required to hold a food safety certification as well as First Aid/ CPR certificate. A childcare worker must hold a valid Working With Children certification to be able to work in an environment where children are present. In addition to this, they may be required to hold a certificate in education, as well as various health safety certifications such as First Aid/ CPR, Anaphylaxis and Asthma certificates. Tracking and implementing qualification compliance measures can present numerous problems for businesses who may not have the resources, time or technical capability to keep track of all staff qualifications, including when the qualifications expire. Tanda simplifies qualification compliance Tanda’s qualification feature assists employers to effectively record, track and roster their staff while meeting their qualification compliance requirements. Qualification documentation can be uploaded to individual employee profiles to indicate the competency of the individual. Teams within Tanda can then also be restricted based on employee qualification type, ensuring that every individual working within the specific team is adequately qualified for the job. For example, an RSA could be the prerequisite qualification for the Bar team, meaning that anyone working within the Bar, from bartenders to glassys, would need to be fully qualified with an RSA. Employers can use the qualification feature to enhance rostering for smarter and more compliant workforce management. Staff are able to easily and quickly view qualifications on the roster, in addition to details such as team and location. Managers will also be alerted to expiring qualifications on the roster; receiving alerts before the qualification expires, and subsequently once it has. Tanda makes it easy for Employers to keep track of staff qualifications, as it’s all stored electronically in one secure location in Tanda. By displaying staff qualifications on the roster, alerting managers to encroaching expiry dates and enabling qualification specific teams Tanda makes it easy for employers to be compliant. Visit the Tanda Help Site for more information on setting up employee qualifications in Tanda.

Knowing when staff are working is one thing, but knowing that staff are qualified and competent can add a huge reassurance for employers.

Industries such as hospitality, childcare and medical services are required to track staff qualifications to meet legal compliance regulations. In addition to recording staff qualifications, childcare centres are required to display staff qualifications on the roster.

Why it’s important to keep a record of staff qualifications

Qualification compliance arises as an issue for businesses, as some jobs legally require the specific qualification and knowledge to perform a certain task or responsibility.

For example: Bartenders must obtain a Responsible Service of Alcohol certification (RSA) before being able to legally work behind a bar and serve alcohol to patrons. If they also work in food production, then they may be required to hold a food safety certification as well as First Aid/ CPR certificate.

A childcare worker must hold a valid Working With Children certification to be able to work in an environment where children are present. In addition to this, they may be required to hold a certificate in education, as well as various health safety certifications such as First Aid/ CPR, Anaphylaxis and Asthma certificates.

Tracking and implementing qualification compliance measures can present numerous problems for businesses who may not have the resources, time or technical capability to keep track of all staff qualifications, including when the qualifications expire.

Tanda simplifies qualification compliance

Tanda’s qualification feature assists employers to effectively record, track and roster their staff while meeting their qualification compliance requirements.

Qualification documentation can be uploaded to individual employee profiles to indicate the competency of the individual. Teams within Tanda can then also be restricted based on employee qualification type, ensuring that every individual working within the specific team is adequately qualified for the job. For example, an RSA could be the prerequisite qualification for the Bar team, meaning that anyone working within the Bar, from bartenders to glassys, would need to be fully qualified with an RSA.

Employers can use the qualification feature to enhance rostering for smarter and more compliant workforce management. Staff are able to easily and quickly view qualifications on the roster, in addition to details such as team and location. Managers will also be alerted to expiring qualifications on the roster; receiving alerts before the qualification expires, and subsequently once it has.

Tanda makes it easy for Employers to keep track of staff qualifications, as it’s all stored electronically in one secure location in Tanda. By displaying staff qualifications on the roster, alerting managers to encroaching expiry dates and enabling qualification specific teams Tanda makes it easy for employers to be compliant.

Visit the Tanda Help Site for more information on setting up employee qualifications in Tanda.

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The Curious Case of the Million-Dollar Oxford Comma

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Ensure Enough Coverage for Your Restaurant at Any Given Time

Traffic at a restaurant ebbs and flows with the times. One moment you’ll only have a handful of patrons, the next an avalanche of customers are queuing at the entrance, waiting to be served. From being overstaffed at a certain time period, suddenly your staff are juggling multiple tables while tickets are lining up like crazy at the kitchen. How do you effectively plan your rosters so that you get the most out of the staff that you have? Forecast Sales and Traffic First things first, of course, is that you have to effectively forecast your restaurant’s sales and traffic at any given day. It might not be an exact science, but Bplans has an in-depth article that can guide you in creating a clear sales forecast. In summary, the article advises that you calculate the number of meals your restaurant can serve based on the number of tables and seats. Multiply those meals based on the amount of service at any given time (in their example, it’s one service during lunch and two services for dinner). Then vary it based on assumptions per day or week (maybe less on Mondays and more on the weekends). And finally, line it up in a spreadsheet. Determine Your FTEs, Make Sure That You Have 2 FTEs more In Any Given Shift So, you have a good sales projection available. Now, it’s time to review your staffing and check if you have enough of everyone for any given shift. It all boils down to the FTEs. FTE stands for “full-time equivalent,” or the number of hours a full-time employee can render in a week. According to this article from TheRestaurantExpert.com, back-of-house employees have 40 hours in one FTE. Those on the front-of-house, on the other hand, have five shifts in one FTE. The same article deep dives on ensuring that your restaurant has enough people through FTEs. Long story short: they recommend to always have two FTEs more than your forecast dictates so that you have enough people covering the restaurant. With that as a rule-of-thumb, you can be creative with your staffing. Cross-train staff so that they can do more than one task. Have bartenders also learn how to cook simple dishes or have new waiters also cover bussing or washing dishes. Craft Your Roster Once everything is set, it’s time for you to make the weekly roster. Make this task quicker for you by leveraging online rostering software that replaces the old-school way of using whiteboards or Excel spreadsheets. Take into consideration your staff’s leave request vis-à-vis your traffic. Remember to send the weekly shift schedule to your staff at least two weeks in advance so that your team is well in the know when they have to time in. Whether you’re a start-up restaurateur or a veteran with a dozen restaurants under your belt, ensuring coverage can make you have sleepless nights. But with a proper plan that you consistently execute and fine-tune, your customers are guaranteed enjoy great service any time of the day.

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About the author

Monic Del Rosario

Monic is Tanda's content curator. She uses her background in Development Studies to create materials that are both business-oriented and human-centric.

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Traffic at a restaurant ebbs and flows with the times. One moment you’ll only have a handful of patrons, the next an avalanche of customers are queuing at the entrance, waiting to be served. From being overstaffed at a certain time period, suddenly your staff are juggling multiple tables while tickets are lining up like […]

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